POSTS BY Christian Joerges

After the Italian Referendum

So much was at stake for Italy, its political class and its economy, and for the European Union (EU) and its member states in the country’s failed referendum on constitutional reform. In the EU, Germany is a particularly sensitive case. The relations between Germany and Italy are a focal point in Europe. They used to be in an asymmetric, albeit comforting, equilibrium.

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Justice within and between Polities

My account on Europe’s justice deficit will depart from a tension inherent to the project, and I will submit three groups of observations: The first one will deal with what we have experienced about the nature of “the economic”; with the use of this notion, I wish to insinuate an analogy to what we associate with “the social”; namely, the social embeddedness of the economy. The following observations are concerned with the distinction between justice within consolidated polities and justice between such polities. The third part of my story will ask, first, whether a synthesis of both concerns, i.e., of domestic and inter-European justice, is conceivable in principle – and then whether it is still available. After the crisis, this is the 1 million dollar question: How can the European project get back on track, regain legitimacy, rise from its ruins?

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EU Commission President: Who and what did we actually vote for?

The obstacles further European integration is facing will only be overcome incrementally through continuous political disputes, as well as through processes of collective learning, which are then converted into institutional change. Simple formulas for “more Europe”, even when they are rooted in historical rationality and reason, will not be a sufficient substitute for such processes.

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Where the Law Ends

“Die Wirtschaft ist das Schicksal” (the economy is our destiny) – this insight of Walter Rathenau, politician and industrialist, the white hope of the young Weimar Republic, murdered in 1922, is of disquieting topicality. For more than a decade, we have witnessed a veritable boom of European constitutionalism which sought to pave the way towards […]

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Where the Law Ends

“Die Wirtschaft ist das Schicksal” (the economy is our destiny) – this insight of Walter Rathenau, politician and industrialist, the white hope of the young Weimar Republic, murdered in 1922, is of disquieting topicality. For more than a decade, we have witnessed a veritable boom of European constitutionalism which sought to pave the way towards […]

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"Ernstnehmen des Anderen. Und zwar als Rechtsgebot! Darum geht es in Europa"

Wenn Sie an Europa 2023 denken, welche Veränderungen fallen Ihnen da am stärksten ins Auge? Man kann da nur in Szenarien denken. Das Wahrscheinlichste ist, dass Europa durch lauter Gewurstele und Geschachere Stück für Stück seine demokratischen Perspektiven verliert und immer mehr zu einer Veranstaltung wird, die zwanghaft auf Wettbewerbsfähigkeit und außenwirtschaftliche Erfolge zielt. Natürlich […]

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Would the election of a Member of the European Parliament as President of the Commission make democratic sense?

By CHRISTIAN JOERGES and FLORIAN RÖDL In a May 23rd Blog, Matthias Kumm reproduces the core arguments laid down in a policy report presented by himself and two other renowned colleagues from the European University Institute,  Bruno de Witte and Miguel Poiares Maduro.[1]  The report is entitled ‘democratic governance of the Euro’ and proposes ways […]

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Direktwahl des EU-Kommissionspräsidenten: Mehr Schaden als Nutzen

Von CHRISTIAN JOERGES und FLORIAN RÖDL Mattias Kumm hat in diesem Blog kürzlich Vorschläge vorgelegt, wie die demokratische Legitimation der EU im Angesicht der Eurokrise gestärkt werden könnte, ohne dass man dazu die europäischen Verträge ändern muss. Die Vorschläge gehen auf einen Policy-Report zum Thema „democratic goverance of the Euro“ (zu deutsch vielleicht: „demokratisches Regieren […]

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