POSTS BY Dimitry Kochenov

How to turn Article 2 TEU into a down-to-Earth provision?

Coming from such an established voice advocating the protection of rule of law at the national level, Kim Scheppele’s proposal definitely enjoys sufficient legitimacy to be taken very seriously. In what follows, I look at the “problem” of democracy (1.), the “problem” with bundling infringements (2.), the problem of determining the meaning of “values” (3.), and the problem with penalties (4.). I conclude that two problems are fictitious but two others are real.

Continue Reading →

Turning EU Citizenship into a Viable Tool of EU Federalism

Dozens of years after the European Economic Community turned into the European Union, we are (still) speaking of the EU as an economic organisation. The Internal Market, which was one among many in a potential palette of the tools of integration became seemly the only tool . The Union has moved on from the customs union and the four types of free movement: it is about so much more now, compared even with 20 years ago. To present the Internal Market as the only tool of European Integration is thus most probably wrong. Yet, what should the alternatives be? What else can be deployed to underpin the core of EU integration next to the internal market? It is to respond to this question that a number of leading scholars on EU citizenship gathered in Oslo on September 13–14, 2013.

Continue Reading →

The EU in its most serious crisis ever (and that’s not the Euro crisis)

Following the recent fascinating exchange in the ‘pages’ of the Verfassungsblog on what to do (or not) with Hungary given the current developments there it seems to be high time to return to the very basic question on the reasons behind the Union in Europe. The question of Europe’s raison d’être is as acute as […]

Continue Reading →

Rescue Package for Fundamental Rights: Comments by DIMITRY KOCHENOV

Armin von Bogdandy and his team have come up with a most fascinating proposal which advances our understanding of the profound connection between EU citizenship and rights. While the general line of argument in the proposal is promising, it is submitted that the proposal is probably not as innovative and not as practical as its […]

Continue Reading →