POSTS BY Mattias Kumm

"A Roguish and Unpopular President is potentially an Occasion for the Judiciary to Shine"

Will Democrats be able to block Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation as Supreme Court Justice, and how will it affect the Court if they won’t? Mattias Kumm on the latest developments in the nomination process and the judiciary’s role in holding the Trump administration in check.

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Impeaching Remnants of the Authoritarian Past: A Constitutional Moment in South Korea

Last Friday, effective March 10 at exactly 11:21 a.m., the sitting President Park Geun-hye was removed from her office by a unanimous decision of the South Korean Constitutional Court. With public life coming to a standstill as eyes focused on TV and internet live broadcasting, the acting Chief Justice delivered the court decision. The conclusion of the constitutional impeachment procedure marked the climax of a transformative ongoing constitutional moment in South Korea.

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Filling the Vacancy left by Scalia: The Democratic Virtues of Delay

If Republicans delayed the procedure or refused to vote on any nominee Obama puts forward, would they violate their constitutional responsibilities, as Democrats insist? In the end I don´t think so. On the contrary: I will argue that there are good grounds of constitutional principle that make delaying the appointment an attractive proposition.

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A Facelift for Verfassungsblog

Today, we proudly present the newly designed Verfassungsblog. We made a big effort to make the blog easier to navigate, to improve readability and accessibility of postings, to offer some new functions such as an Events calender, and generally to provide a fresh, modern experience for users of the blog. A big, warm thank you goes out to the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, particularly its Center for Global Constitutionalism, which generously supported us to make this relaunch possible.

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Verfassungsblog Enters into Partnership with WZB’s Center for Global Constitutionalism

The Center for Global Constitutionalism at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center has joined Wissenschaftskolleg/Recht im Kontext as a strong institutional partner of the Verfassungsblog. Together, we are looking forward to build on the blog´s achievement and further strengthen its position as a leading forum of debate on topical questions of national, European and global constitutionalism, fostering exchange between academic expert knowledge and the political public sphere, while consolidating Berlin’s reputation as a place where cutting edge research on pressing contemporary public law questions is conducted and exciting debates at the interface between law, politics and society are launched.

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An Empire of Capital? Transatlantic Investment Protection as the Institutionalization of Unjustified Privilege

The field of investor state arbitration is historically connected to purposes and contexts, which are strikingly different from the contemporary world of trade and investment relations between liberal constitutional democracies. What might conceivably have been a mutually useful policy instrument in the relationship between developing and developed countries has no plausible role to play in the relationship between developed liberal constitutional democracies. The idea of investment arbitration as a field with its own separate dispute resolution infrastructure should be seen as an inherently dubious transitional phenomenon that deserves to wither away over time, rather than being reformed.

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An Empire of Capital? Transatlantic Investment Protection as the Institutionalization of Unjustified Privilege

The field of investor state arbitration is historically connected to purposes and contexts, which are strikingly different from the contemporary world of trade and investment relations between liberal constitutional democracies. What might conceivably have been a mutually useful policy instrument in the relationship between developing and developed countries has no plausible role to play in the relationship between developed liberal constitutional democracies. The idea of investment arbitration as a field with its own separate dispute resolution infrastructure should be seen as an inherently dubious transitional phenomenon that deserves to wither away over time, rather than being reformed.

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Why Armstrong is wrong and there IS in fact a legal duty to appoint Juncker

Thankfully the Treaties provide the basis for leaving behind the ancien régime of executive federalism and pushes towards a more democratic politics in Europe. Ironically the path to a brighter democratic future in Europe depends to a nontrivial extent on the Council acting in conformity with its duty to nominate a perhaps less than inspiring steady hand of the past as Commission President.

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Why Armstrong is wrong and there IS in fact a legal duty to appoint Juncker

Thankfully the Treaties provide the basis for leaving behind the ancien régime of executive federalism and pushes towards a more democratic politics in Europe. Ironically the path to a brighter democratic future in Europe depends to a nontrivial extent on the Council acting in conformity with its duty to nominate a perhaps less than inspiring steady hand of the past as Commission President.

Continue Reading →