On the Slippery Slope to a ,People’s Court'

Writes Matej Avbelj in High time for popular constitutionalism!, ‘The majority in our societies seems to be increasingly disconnected with the liberal values that especially the legal academia, but also the ruling political class – at least on a declaratory level – have taken for granted…’ Living as I do in the country in which one sees an increasing distaste for the European Convention of Human Rights and regular media criticism of the ‘unelected judges’ in Strasbourg – and that despite the fact that the judges of the Court are, in fact, elected from a slate of three by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe – I cannot help wondering whether the disconnect is anything very new.

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Fighting Judicial Corruption with Constitutional Measures: the Albanian Case

No state can thrive with corrupt political and legal elites. But if lawmakers and judges are corrupt themselves, fighting corruption with legal means is all but impossible. As a step towards membership in the European Union, Albania has embedded a comprehensive reform of its anti-corruption law directly into its constitution.

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Über die Selbstrechtfertigung unabhängiger Institutionen

In der letzten Woche hörte ich auf einer Tagung den Vortrag eines höheren Beamten der EZB über die internen Entscheidungsprozeduren im Governing Council. Weil eine Publikation nicht abgesprochen ist, will ich meinen Bericht anonymisieren. Der Vortrag war affirmativ. Der Redner wies darauf hin, dass der Council Entscheidungen treffen müsse, die nicht immer angenehm wären. Dies […]

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