The Teething of EU’s Mutual Defence Clause

France was the first member state to call for mutual assistance under Article 42(7) of the Lisbon treaty. The move came as a surprise. Most of the discussions in previous days were focused on the possibility to use the much heftier Article 5 defence clause of NATO. Compared to the tangible military assistance that NATO partners can offer, Europe’s obligation to assist has so far been seen as toothless and symbolic. While the EU’s mutual defence clause is still limited in its effect, its use is a timely reminder that there is strong interest within the EU to work closer together on defence.

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Transnational State-Liability Law? Kundus on Trial

Next week the Bonn regional court will begin hearing evidence in the suit brought by victims of the Kundus attack, who are seeking compensation for damages. Just a few weeks ago Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court published its chamber decision regarding the constitutional complaint entered by victims of the bombing of the Varvarin bridge in the Kosovo War. The First Chamber of the Second Senate did not itself field the constitutional complaint, but it did make certain critical suggestions as to the contours of a transnational state-liability law. The Bonn regional-court decision will show how the civil courts will assimilate this.

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