Hungary’s Struggle: In a Permanent State of Exception

The Hungarian government has called for a referendum on EU relocation quota plan and declared a “nationwide migrant crisis”. The justification given by the government for these measures was the “massive immigration” which “endangers the jobs of Hungarians and redraws Hungary’s cultural and religious identity”. The argument went that, due to a “migrant crisis” the Hungarian government needed a greater room for maneuvre, not limited by constitutional constraints, in order to manage the crisis. This argument presupposes that, as a result of the migrant crisis, Hungary has ended up in a state of exception, when constitutional guarantees have to be limited or suspended; essential powers have to be concentrated in the hands of the prime minister, until the crisis is overcome.

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What will happen if the Dutch vote ‘No’ in the Referendum on the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement?

On 6 April 2016, a referendum on the approval of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement will be held in the Netherlands. This is the direct result of a new law that gives citizens the right to initiate a so-called ‘corrective’ referendum to refute decisions taken at the political level. If the „No“ camp prevails, as polls suggest it will, that would not be a victory for democracy as proclaimed by the Dutch initiators of the referendum but rather the opposite. Allowing a relatively small part of the population in a relatively small member state to block the entry into force of an agreement which is approved by the national parliaments of 29 countries and the European Parliament would be very cynical. It would also undermine the consistency and legitimacy of the EU’s external action taking into account that other, largely comparable agreements would remain unaffected.

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The ‘Brexit’ Referendum: We Need to Talk about the (General Election) Franchise

The franchise for the ,Brexit‘ referendum will mostly follow eligibility for voting in a UK general election. This invites serious reflection on the anomalies of the current general election franchise in the UK: Citizens living abroad are not allowed to vote, and neither are EU citizens from other countries – unless they are Irish, Cypriots or Maltese who are enfranchised as citizens of member states of the Commonwealth. Could this be challenged under EU or ECHR law?

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Baustelle Bundesstaat? Steven Schällers Replik auf den Kommentar von Alexandra Kemmerer

Auf Einladung der Kolleginnen und Kollegen vom theorieblog habe ich vor einigen Tagen einen Beitrag von Steven Schäller aus der ersten Ausgabe des 2012er Jahrgangs der Zeitschrift für Politische Theorie kommentiert, in dem Steven Schäller einige Überlegungen zur Europa-Rechtsprechung des Bundesverfassungsgerichts und deren Rezeption formuliert. Steven Schäller hat nun reagiert. Ich danke ihm, dem Theorieblog […]

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Baustelle Bundesstaat? Steven Schällers ZPTH-Artikel in der Diskussion

In der ersten Ausgabe des 2012er Jahrgangs der Zeitschrift für Politische Theorie stellt Steven Schäller einige Überlegungen zur Europa-Rechtsprechung des Bundesverfassungsgerichts und deren Rezeption an – eine Intervention in einer Diskussion, die ja gerade mit den jüngsten Urteilen noch weiter an Brisanz gewinnt und uns mit den laufenden Verfahren in Karlsruhe in den nächsten Tagen besonders […]

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