Summer of Love: Karlsruhe Refers the QE Case to Luxembourg

It seems that the BVerfG has learned a lesson. Yesterday’s referral about the the European Central Bank’s policy of Quantitative Easing (QE) sets a completely different tone. It reads like a modest and balanced plea for judicial dialogue, rather than an indictment. Fifty years after the original event, a new Summer of Love seems to thrive between the highest judicial bodies. It shows no traces of the aplomb with which Karlsruhe presented its stance to Luxembourg three years ago.

Continue Reading →

Reviewing the recent Ban on Ritual Slaughter in Flanders

Flanders has adopted a ban of religious slaughter without stunning, following the Walloon region that had done the same earlier this year. In analysing the Flemish decree, three critical remarks need to be made in putting the new law into the right legal perspective.

Continue Reading →

Linking Efficiency with Fundamental Rights in the Dublin System: the Case of Mengesteab

The recent CJEU decision "Mengesteab" has two significant consequences for Member States. First, applicants have a right to challenge the procedural steps by which Member States arrive at decisions regarding responsibility for protection applications to insure their fidelity to the rules prescribed in the Dublin Regulation. Second, the duty of Member States to begin assessing which state holds this responsibility engages as soon as the competent authority identified pursuant to article 35(1) of the regulation becomes aware of a request for international protection.

Continue Reading →

The French Antiterrorist Bill: A Permanent State of Emergency

In July, a government bill against terrorism was adopted to replace the French state of emergency, which is in force since the terrorist attacks of November 2015. Critics have long complained about the lasting of the etat d’urgence. An analysis of the new bill however reveals that it is still a threat for human rights and in that matter rather a softened version of the state of emergency.

Continue Reading →

The Opinion of Advocate General Bot in Taricco II: Seven “Deadly” Sins and a Modest Proposal

The wind of populism is blowing across Europe and courts (including constitutional and supreme courts) are not immune therefrom. Within this context, the enforcement of the constitutional identity clause to contrast the application and, sometimes, the primacy of EU law would be a powder keg waiting to be lit. In the latest act in the Taricco saga, Advocate General Bot in his opinion in Taricco II does nothing to defuse it – on the contrary.

Continue Reading →

Neues vom Glossator 7: Über Ähnlichkeiten

Die Verkleidung des Richters und die Verkleidung der Muslima sind ähnlich, weil sie beide aus einer Abschirmung rühren, die auf gleiche Weise dogmatisch besetzt ist. Auch wenn, zumindest in der deutschen Übersetzung des Koran, mit der Bedeckung der Haare die Keuschheit, Sittsamkeit oder Schamhaftigkeit der Frau und mit der Verkleidung des Richters seine Neutralität symbolisiert oder umgesetzt werden soll, gibt es doch eine Entsprechung, und die liegt in der Abschirmung. Wenn man hijab mit Absperrung oder Verhüllung übersetzt, wie das einige vorschlagen, dann tragen Richter auch einen hijab.

Continue Reading →

A 50/50 Ball: The East versus the EU in the Refugee Relocation Game

Last week, Advocate General Yves Bot dismissed the claims of Hungary and Slovakia against the EU refugee relocation scheme. The Commission has launched an infringement procedure against the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland for not fulfilling their quota. The East/West divide in the matter of refugee relocation could be seen as evidence that the former communist countries are culturally backwards, liberally underdeveloped, and have low tolerance levels in regards to cultural and religious diversity. Yet there is no empirical research that shows that the East is more racist and xenophobic than the West. What else could explain this dangerous phenomenon?

Continue Reading →

Subjektive Rechte aus der Dublin-Verordnung: Der Fall Mengesteab vor dem EuGH

Neben der Geschichte der Dublin-Verordnung als äußerst zähem System einer ungerechten Zuständigkeitsverteilung zwischen Staaten gibt es eine zweite Geschichte der Dublin-Verordnung: Die langsame Stärkung der subjektiven Rechte von Asylbewerbern. Diese Geschichte erhält ein weiteres Kapitel mit dem diese Woche verkündeten Urteil Mengesteab des Europäischen Gerichtshofs. Die Entscheidung ist hochrelevant für die Praxis, weil sie die Fristenberechnung betrifft, bis wann ein Asylsuchender in einen anderen Mitgliedstaat gemäß Dublin-Zuständigkeit zurückgewiesen werden kann. Und die Entscheidung markiert zugleich, dass angesichts politischer Lethargie die größte Hoffnung für eine Veränderung des festgefahrenen Dublin-Systems in den Klagemöglichkeiten liegt.

Continue Reading →

Klarheit im Gemischtwarenladen „Flüchtlingskrise“: Zu den Urteilen des EuGH in den Fällen Jafari und A.S.

Mit den Urteilen „zur Flüchtlingskrise“ vom 26. Juli 2017 hat der EuGH gezeigt, dass er trotz seiner Sonderrolle, die es ihm erlaubt europarechtliche Normen verbindlich auszulegen, seine Aufgabe als Judikative versteht und nicht als Legislative. Er legt das Recht so aus, wie es das Völker- und das Europarecht verlangen, nämlich in erster Linie nach Wortlaut sowie nach dem Zusammenhang und dem Ziel der Normen.

Continue Reading →

Passenger Name Records – from Canada back to the EU

Passenger name records have been a highly sensitive topic of EU legislation for years. The new opinion 1/15 of the Court of Justice needs to be read against this political background. The opinion will have major repercussions both for the relations of the EU with partner countries and the development of the EU’s own counterterrorism or internal security policy. 

Continue Reading →