Hello – and Goodbye! How Royal Powerplay aborted Malaysia’s ICC Membership

On 5 April 2019, the United States revoked the visa of the ICC chief prosecutor because of her attempts to investigate allegations of war crimes in Afghanistan, including any that may have been committed by American forces. On the same day, Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad announced that his country was withdrawing its signature from the Rome Statute, just one month after having signed it. Did the Malaysian drama just coincide with Washington’s move? The most likely answer is yes. Rather, it reflects long-existing tensions between Malaysia’s federal government and the country’s royalty.

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Of Rhetoric and Reality: The Nobel Peace Prize and Conflict-Related Sexualized Violence

Tonight, Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad will jointly receive the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, Norway, “for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict”. This event provides a good opportunity to take a look at the development of narratives and the legal treatment of conflict-related sexual violence.

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Bye bye, ICC! The Philippines’ farewell put into perspective

On 14 March 2018, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte announced that the Philippines will withdraw from the International Criminal Court (ICC, the Court) “effective immediately.” Duterte’s intention to reject the ICC’s jurisdiction exemplifies the Court’s fragile foothold across Southeast Asia. Cambodia and the Philippines have been the only two ICC members among the ten ASEAN countries. Thailand signed the Statute in 2000, but not yet proceeded to ratification. An explanation of this Southeast Asian hesitation may be found in distinct attitudes and principles within and between the ASEAN countries.

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Die Verfolgung der Rohingya in Myanmar – Ein Fall für den internationalen Strafgerichtshof?

Die gewaltsame Vertreibung der Rohingya seit August 2017 aus Myanmar erschüttert die Weltgemeinschaft und weckt dunkle Erinnerungen an Völkerrechtsverbrechen im ehemaligen Jugoslawien und in Ruanda. UN-Vertreter sprechen bereits von Genozid und Verbrechen gegen die Menschlichkeit. In den vergangenen Wochen wurden angesichts dieser gravierenden Menschenrechtsverletzungen vermehrt Rufe nach einer strafrechtlichen Verfolgung durch den internationalen Strafgerichtshof laut. Doch welche Erfolgsaussichten haben diese Bestrebungen? Ein kurzer Überblick.

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South Africa’s Withdrawal from the ICC: The High Court Judgment and its Limits

Domestic legal challenges to the South Africa government’s decision to withdraw from the ICC are underway, and while the first instalment has a distinctly Brexit flavor, it also foreshadows more substantive constitutional arguments to come.

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South Africa and the ICC, or: Whose Rights Does the Constitution Protect?  

When the South African government announced that it would withdraw from the International Criminal Court, a great number of commenters expressed shock and disappointment. Legal commentators have also weighed in, questioning the legality of withdrawing from the ICC (here) and a legal challenge on several terms seems inevitable. Here, I want to consider the possibility of challenging the withdrawal on the basis of the Bill of Rights.

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