25 September 2014

Back to post-9/11 panic? Security Council resolution on foreign terrorist fighters

The United Nations Security Council has adopted a resolution on foreign terrorist fighters on Wednesday, September 24, with President Barack Obama chairing the meeting. This is not a mere political declaration adopted at highest political level but a “legislative” resolution with “teeth,” adopted under Chapter VII of the UN Charter and therefore legally binding for all UN Member States and obtaining, by virtue of Article 103 of the Charter, primacy in relation to any other international agreement of states.

This blog post argues that the resolution constitutes a huge backlash in the UN counter-terrorism regime, comparable to Security Council Resolution (SCR) 1373, adopted in the immediate aftermath of the atrocious terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. It wipes out the piecemeal progress made over 13 long years in introducing protections of human rights and the rule of law into the highly problematic manner in which the Security Council exercises its supranational powers.

When the UN Charter was adopted in 1945, a careful balance was struck between the powers of various UN organs, and in particular between the General Assembly and the Security Council. While the General Assembly represents the development of international law, adoption of new legally binding treaties, traditional modes of decision-making in international organizations and therefore respect for the sovereign equality of states, the Security Council is in charge of addressing threats to international peace and security, through political action by a small number of states including five major victors of World War Two and, if necessary, supranational enforcement. Judicial powers were vested with the International Court of Justice with authority to resolve disputes between states in contentious cases.

Then came Osama bin Laden, Al-Qaida and 9/11. International terrorism was identified by the Security Council as a threat to peace and security, and the Security Council took for itself both “legislative” and “judicial” powers. Two crucial moments were SCR 1373 in September 2001, legislating on legal obligations of Member States in the combat against terrorism, and SCR 1390 that, in early 2002, broadened the earlier mechanism of temporary smart sanctions against the leaders of the Taliban in Afghanistan into a permanent global list of Al-Qaida and Taliban terrorists.

As the first UN Special Rapporteur on human rights and counter-terrorism (2005-2011), I took the view that the Security Council was acting ultra vires, going beyond its powers as provided by the UN Charter. This was because the SCR 1267 mechanism of smart sanctions had been converted, mainly through SCR 1390, into a permanent regime of permanent sanctions against individuals and entities, without geographical or temporal limits and providing for sanctions that for their severity were analogous to criminal punishment. And this was also because the SCR 1373 regime was maintained as the legal basis for UN action against terrorism beyond any reasonable duration of a crisis situation that had emerged on 9/11. The story has been told and carefully documented in Lisa Ginsborg, The New Face of the Security Council since 9/11: Global Counter-Terrorism, Human Rights and International Law, PhD thesis in law approved at the European University Institute in June 2014.

The new Security Council Resolution identifies, in its preambular paragraph 1 (PP1), as one of the most serious threats to international peace and security, “terrorism in all forms and manifestations”—not just international terrorism or specific forms of it. It imposes upon all Member States far-reaching new legal obligations without any effort to define or limit the categories of persons who may be identified as “terrorists” by an individual state. This approach carries a huge risk of abuse, as various states apply notoriously wide, vague or abusive definitions of terrorism, often with a clear political or oppressive motivation.

The most alarming provision in the draft Resolution is its operative paragraph 6 (OP6):

“6. Recalls its decision, in resolution 1373 (2001), that all Member States shall ensure that any person who participates in the financing, planning, preparation or perpetration of terrorist acts or in supporting terrorist acts is brought to justice, and decides that all States shall ensure that their domestic laws and regulations establish serious criminal offenses sufficient to provide the ability to prosecute and to penalize in a manner duly reflecting the seriousness of the offense:

a)  their nationals who travel or attempt to travel to a State other than their States of residence or nationality, and other individuals who travel or attempt to travel from their territories to a State other than their States of residence or nationality, for the purpose of the perpetration, planning, or preparation of, or participation in, terrorist acts, or the providing or receiving of terrorist training;
b)  the wilful provision or collection, by any means, directly or indirectly, of funds by their nationals or in their territories with the intention that the funds should be used, or in the knowledge that they are to be used, in order to finance the travel of individuals who travel to a State other than their States of residence or nationality for the purpose of the perpetration, planning, or preparation of, or participation in, terrorist acts or the providing or receiving of terrorist training; and,

c)  the wilful organization, or other facilitation, including acts of recruitment, by their nationals or in their territories, of the travel of individuals who travel to a State other than their States of residence or nationality for the purpose of the perpetration, planning, or preparation of, or participation in, terrorist acts or the providing or receiving of terrorist training”

This provision, even if difficult to enforce by the Security Council itself, and therefore representing a panic reaction that is mainly symbolic at UN level, will provide a handy tool for oppressive regimes that choose to stigmatize as “terrorism” whatever they do not like – for instance political opposition, trade unions, religious movements, minority or indigenous groups, etc. Let us assume that a country applies a definition of terrorism that includes organized campaigns of indigenous groups toward self-determination by non-violent means. Criminalizing the provision of training to empower these groups, including in the field of human rights, would then be legitimized by OP6. The repressive regime would refer to its obligations under the UN Charter to justify a crackdown upon travel, training and funding of organizations and movements said to constitute a threat to the oppressive regime itself – even when totally nonviolent.

The situation of the Uighurs in China, or the harassment experienced in recent days by leaders of Russian indigenous communities trying to travel to New York for the World Conference on indigenous peoples, demonstrate that the above scenario is totally realistic.

The draft resolution has other problems as well, including:

  • failure to mention human rights in PP5;
  • repeating the wrongful implication in PP19 that abuse of refugee status would constitute a real terrorist threat;
  • imposition of an obligation to exchange passenger name records in OP9, without providing proper safeguards; and
  • failure to maintain and further develop the idea first adopted in 2008 in SCR 1822 that the UN itself must comply with human rights when combating terrorism.

What makes the new resolution into a serious backlash adopted in panic is the combination of OP1 and PP6. The resolution must be fixed by:

  • limiting the identified threat to peace and security to international terrorism or specific forms of it;
  • carefully considering in each paragraph whether the measures could be restricted in scope, so that they apply only in respect of  individuals and entities associated with Al-Qaida; and
  • restricting the scope of abusive application by individual states by including a provision defining the constitutive elements of international terrorism that legitimately are subject to UN action.

The last-mentioned fix could be made by repeating OP3 of SCR 1566 adopted in 2004, as an important step in mitigating the consequences of 9/11 panic. Failure to include such a clause is the clearest demonstration that we are now confronted with a backlash pushed through in panic. While SCR 1566 may not be a perfect definition of terrorism, it nevertheless is the best that the Security Council has said in the matter and is capable of curtailing abuse by demonstrating that the Security Council can only oblige states to combat such forms of international terrorism that, inter alia, entail deadly or otherwise serious physical violence against human beings and that have been included in international conventions and protocols on specific forms of terrorism. In sum, according to OP3 of SCR 1566 the three cumulative conditions upon what constitutes international terrorism are:

“[1] criminal acts, including against civilians, committed with the intent to cause death or serious bodily injury, or taking of hostages, [2] with the purpose to provoke a state of terror in the general public or in a group of persons or particular persons, intimidate a population or compel a government or an international organization to do or to abstain from doing any act, [3] which constitute offences within the scope of and as defined in the international conventions and protocols relating to terrorism.”

Better to fix now than later. Resolution 1373 required a lot of subsequent fixes and never became very good. Why do we have to see the same happening again?

This article has been previously published by JustSecurity.org and is re-published here with kind permission by the author. For a German translation of the article, please click here


SUGGESTED CITATION  Scheinin, Martin: Back to post-9/11 panic? Security Council resolution on foreign terrorist fighters, VerfBlog, 2014/9/25, https://verfassungsblog.de/back-post-911-panic-security-council-resolution-foreign-terrorist-fighters/.

Leave A Comment

WRITE A COMMENT

1. We welcome your comments but you do so as our guest. Please note that we will exercise our property rights to make sure that Verfassungsblog remains a safe and attractive place for everyone.

2. We expect comments to be matter-of-fact, on-topic and free of sarcasm, innuendo and ad personam arguments.

3. Racist, sexist and otherwise discriminatory comments will be deleted.

4. Comments under pseudonym are allowed but a valid email address is obligatory. In case of doubt comments will be published after an email to the stated address has been answered. The use of more than one pseudonym is not allowed.




Other posts about this region:
Deutschland


Other posts about this region:
Deutschland
No Comments Join the discussion
25 September 2014

Zurück zur Post-9/11-Panik? Die Resolution des UN-Sicherheitsrats zu Terrorkämpfern

Der Sicherheitsrat der Vereinten Nationen hat am Mittwoch, dem 24. September, unter dem Vorsitz von US-Präsident Barack Obama die Resolution zu ausländischen Terrorkämpfern angenommen. Es handelt sich dabei nicht nur um eine politische Erklärung auf höchster politischer Ebene, sondern um eine „legislative“ Resolution mit „Zähnen“, beschlossen unter Kapitel VII der Charta der Vereinten Nationen und nach Art. 103 der Charta mit Vorrang im Verhältnis zu anderen völkerrechtlichen Vereinbarungen ausgestattet.

Dieser Blogpost argumentiert, dass die Resolution einen gigantischen Rückschlag im UN-Terrorbekämpfungsregime darstellt, vergleichbar mit der Sicherheitsratsresolution 1373, die unmittelbar nach den fürchterlichen Terroranschlägen vom 11. September 2001 beschlossen wurde. Sie macht den über 13 lange Jahre Stück für Stück erzielten Fortschritt bei der Einführung von Menschenrechtsschutz und Rechtsstaatlichkeit in die hoch problematische Art, mit der der Sicherheitsrat seine supranationale Hoheitsgewalt ausübt, zunichte.

Als die UN-Charta 1945 angenommen wurde, schuf sie eine sorgfältig austarierte Balance zwischen den Zuständigkeiten der verschiedenen UN-Organe, vor allem zwischen der Generalversammlung und dem Sicherheitsrat. Während die Generalversammlung die Entwicklung des Völkerrechts repräsentiert, die Annahme neuer rechtsverbindlicher Verträge, herkömmliche Wege der Entscheidungsfindung in internationalen Organisationen und dementsprechend Respekt vor der souveränen Gleichheit der Staaten, ist der Sicherheitsrat zuständig, sich um Bedrohungen gegen den internationalen Frieden und die Sicherheit zu kümmern, durch politisches Handeln einer kleinen Zahl von Staaten, eingeschlossen die fünf Siegermächte des Zweiten Weltkriegs, und, wenn nötig, durch supranationale Durchsetzung. Die rechtsprechende Gewalt wurde dem Internationalen Gerichtshof anvertraut, mit der Autorität zur Streitschlichtung zwischen Staaten in umstrittenen Fällen.

Dann kamen Osama bin Laden, Al-Qaida und der 11. September. Der internationale Terrorismus wurde vom Sicherheitsrat als Bedrohung von Frieden und Sicherheit identifiziert, und der Sicherheitsrat nahm für sich selbst sowohl „legislative“ als auch „judikative“ Gewalt in Anspruch. Die beiden Schlüsselmomente waren die Resolutionen Nr. 1373 vom September 2001, die den Mitgliedsstaaten im Kampf gegen den Terrorismus rechtliche Verpflichtungen auferlegte, und Nr. 1390, die Anfang 2002 die früheren, zeitlich begrenzten Smart Sanctions gegen die Talibanführung in Afghanistan in eine dauerhafte weltweite Liste von Al-Qaida- und Taliban-Terroristen ausweitete.

Als erster UN-Sonderberichterstatter für Menschenrechte im Kampf gegen den internationalen Terror (2005-2011) hatte ich die Position eingenommen, dass der Sicherheitsrat jenseits seiner Zuständigkeiten nach der UN-Charta handelt. Der Grund war, dass die Smart-Sanctions-Mechanismen der Resolution Nr. 1267 umgewandelt worden waren, vor allem durch die Resolution Nr. 1390, in ein dauerhaftes Regime dauerhafter Sanktionen gegen Einzelne und Organisationen, ohne geografische und zeitliche Grenzen und die Grundlage für Sanktionen liefernd, die in ihrer Schwere dem Strafrecht entsprechen. Der Grund war außerdem, dass das Regime der Resolution Nr. 1373 als Rechtsbasis für UN-Aktionen herhielt, die zeitlich weit über die Krisensituation nach dem 11. September hinausgriffen. Den Hergang dieser Geschichte erzählt und dokumentiert Lisa Ginsborg in ihrer im Juni 2014 am EUI angenommen Dissertation „The New Face of the Security Council since 9/11: Global Counter-Terrorism, Human Rights and International Law„.

Die neue Sioherheitsratsresolution identifiziert im ersten Absatz der Präambel (PP1)als eine der ernstesten Bedrohungen für internationalen Frieden und Sicherheit “terrorism in all forms and manifestations”—nicht nur internationalen Terrorismus oder spezielle Formen davon. Sie legt allen Mitgliedsstaaten weitreichende neue Rechtspflichten auf, ohne sich irgendeine Mühe zu geben, die Kategorien von Personen zu definieren oder zu begrenzen, die von einem einzelnen Staat als „Terroristen“ identifiziert werden könnten. Dieser Ansatz birgt ein enormes Missbrauchsrisiko, da verschiedene Staaten dafür berüchtigt sich, weite, vage und missbräuchliche Definitionen von Terrorismus zu verwenden, oftmals mit klaren politischen oder unterdrückerischen Motiven.

Die alarmierendste Passage in der Resolution ist ihr Absatz 6 (OP6):

“6. Recalls its decision, in resolution 1373 (2001), that all Member States shall ensure that any person who participates in the financing, planning, preparation or perpetration of terrorist acts or in supporting terrorist acts is brought to justice, and decides that all States shall ensure that their domestic laws and regulations establish serious criminal offenses sufficient to provide the ability to prosecute and to penalize in a manner duly reflecting the seriousness of the offense:

a)  their nationals who travel or attempt to travel to a State other than their States of residence or nationality, and other individuals who travel or attempt to travel from their territories to a State other than their States of residence or nationality, for the purpose of the perpetration, planning, or preparation of, or participation in, terrorist acts, or the providing or receiving of terrorist training;
b)  the wilful provision or collection, by any means, directly or indirectly, of funds by their nationals or in their territories with the intention that the funds should be used, or in the knowledge that they are to be used, in order to finance the travel of individuals who travel to a State other than their States of residence or nationality for the purpose of the perpetration, planning, or preparation of, or participation in, terrorist acts or the providing or receiving of terrorist training; and,

c)  the wilful organization, or other facilitation, including acts of recruitment, by their nationals or in their territories, of the travel of individuals who travel to a State other than their States of residence or nationality for the purpose of the perpetration, planning, or preparation of, or participation in, terrorist acts or the providing or receiving of terrorist training”

Diese Norm ist zwar schwer vom Sicherheitsrat selbst durchzusetzen und stellt daher auf UN-Ebene eine hauptsächlich symbolische Panikreaktion dar. Sie stattet aber repressive Regimes mit einem praktischen Werkzeug aus, die alles als „Terrorismus“ stigmatisieren wollen, was sie nicht mögen – ob das die politische Opposition ist, Gewerkschaften, Glaubensgemeinschaften, Minderheiten oder Ureinwohnergruppen usw.. Angenommen ein Land verwendet eine Terrorismusdefinition, die organisierte, gewaltfreie Kampagnen von Ureinwohnergruppen für mehr Selbstbestimmung einschließt – die Kriminalisierung von Trainingsmaßnahmen, um diese Gruppen etwa im Bereich der Menschenrechte auszubilden, könnte dann durch OP6 legitimiert werden. Das repressive Regime könnte sich auf seine Pflichten aus der UN-Charta stützen, um ein hartes Durchgreifen gegen Reisen, Training und Finanzierung von Organisationen und Bewegungen zu rechtfertigen, die man als Bedrohung für das Unterdrückungsregime selbst darstellt – sogar wenn sie völlig gewaltfrei sind.

Die Situation der Uighuren in China oder die Behinderungen, die kürzlich die Führungspersonen von Ureinwohnergruppen aus Russland erleben musste, als sie nach New York zur Weltkonferenz indigener Völker reisen wollten, zeigen, dass das besagte Szenario absolut realistisch ist.

Es gibt noch andere Probleme mit dem Resolutionsentwurf, darunter:

  • das Fehlen jeder Erwähnung der Menschenrechte in PP5;
  • die Wiederholung der falschen Implikation in PP19, dass der Missbrauch des Flüchtlingsstatus eine reale Terrorgefahr darstellt;
  • die Auferlegung einer Pflicht in OP9, Passagiernamensdaten auszutauschen, ohne jegliche Sicherungsmaßnahme; sowie
  • das Versäumnis, die zuerst in der Resolution 1822 entwickelten Idee fortzuführen und auszubauen, dass die Vereinten Nationen selbst die Menschenrechte im Kampf gegen den Terror achten müssen.

Was die neue Resolution zu einem ernsten, in Panik beschlossenen Rückschlag macht, ist die Kombination von OP1 und PP6. Die Resolution muss korrigiert werden, indem :

  • die identifizierte Bedrohung für Frieden und Sicherheit auf den internationalen Terrorismus oder besondere Formen desselben begrenzt wird;
  • in jedem Absatz sorgfältig erwogen wird, ob die Maßnahmen in ihrem Geltungsbereich beschränkt werden können, so dass sie nur in Bezug auf Individuen und Organisationen in Verbindung mit Al-Qaida gelten; und
  • die Möglichkeit missbräuchlicher Anwendung durch einzelne Staaten eingeschränkt wird, indem eine Definition der konstitutiven Elemente des internationalen Terrorismus, die legitimerweise Gegenstand von UN-Aktionen sind, eingefügt wird.

Die letztgenannte Korrektur könnte vorgenommen werden, indem man OP3 der Resolution Nr. 1566 aus dem Jahr 2004 einfügt, ein wichtiger Schritt in der Entschärfung der Konsequenzen der Post-9/11-Panik. Das Versäumnis, eine solche Norm einzufügen, ist der klarste Beweis, dass wir es jetzt mit einem Rückschlag zu tun haben, der in Panik durchgesetzt wurde. Resolution Nr. 1566 mag keine perfekte Definition des Terrorismus sein, aber es ist nichtsdestotrotz das Beste, was der Sicherheitsrat in dieser Sache hervorgebracht hat, und es ist in der Lage, Missbrauch zu verhindern, da der Sicherheitsrat die Mitgliedsstaaten nur zum Kampf gegen solche Formen des internationalen Terrorismus verpflichten kann, die unter anderem tödliche oder anderweitige physische Gewalt gegen Menschen einschließen und in internationale Abkommen und Protokolle zu spezifischen Formen des Terrorismus aufgenommen wurden. Alles in allen müssen nach OP3 der Resolution Nr. 1566 drei Bedingungen kumulativ erfüllt sein, damit internationaler Terrorismus vorliegt:

“[1] criminal acts, including against civilians, committed with the intent to cause death or serious bodily injury, or taking of hostages, [2] with the purpose to provoke a state of terror in the general public or in a group of persons or particular persons, intimidate a population or compel a government or an international organization to do or to abstain from doing any act, [3] which constitute offences within the scope of and as defined in the international conventions and protocols relating to terrorism.”

Das sollte besser früher als später korrigiert werden. Die Resolution Nr. 1373 hat eine Menge fortlaufender Korrekturen erfordert und wurde nie wirklich gut. Warum müssen wir das jetzt schon wieder erleben?

Dieser Artikel ist zuvor auf JustSecurity.org erschienen. Übersetzung aus dem Englischen: Maximilian Steinbeis.

 


SUGGESTED CITATION  Scheinin, Martin: Zurück zur Post-9/11-Panik? Die Resolution des UN-Sicherheitsrats zu Terrorkämpfern, VerfBlog, 2014/9/25, https://verfassungsblog.de/back-post-911-panic-security-council-resolution-foreign-terrorist-fighters/, DOI: 10.17176/20170504-185242.

2 Comments

  1. […] This article has been previously published by JustSecurity.org and is re-published here with kind permission by the author. For a German translation of the article, please click here.  […]

  2. […] noch im Verfassungsblog eine Analyse zur Sicherheitsratsresolution von […]

Leave A Comment

WRITE A COMMENT

1. We welcome your comments but you do so as our guest. Please note that we will exercise our property rights to make sure that Verfassungsblog remains a safe and attractive place for everyone.

2. We expect comments to be matter-of-fact, on-topic and free of sarcasm, innuendo and ad personam arguments.

3. Racist, sexist and otherwise discriminatory comments will be deleted.

4. Comments under pseudonym are allowed but a valid email address is obligatory. In case of doubt comments will be published after an email to the stated address has been answered. The use of more than one pseudonym is not allowed.




Other posts about this region:
Syrien


Other posts about this region:
Syrien
2 comments Join the discussion
Go to Top