15 Mai 2014

Some Reflections on the ECtHR’s First Award of Inter-State Satisfaction

What is the relationship between a regional human rights system, like the one set up by the European Convention on Human Rights, and general international law? This question has occupied legal minds for quite some time. Monday’s judgment by the European Court for Human Rights does not provide an unambiguous answer.

On Monday, the Court ordered Turkey to pay the Cypriot government a total of 90 million euros in respect of non-pecuniary damage suffered by Greek Cypriots in 1974 during the Turkish invasion of Cyprus. As has already been pointed out on this blog, the judgment must be seen in conjunction with a Court judgment delivered in 2001, where the Court had found that Turkey had violated a number of obligations under the European Convention on Human Rights. In the 2001 judgment, the Court had adjourned the question of a just satisfaction to the victims’ families. This week’s judgment is the first in the history of the ECtHR’s history awarding just satisfaction in an inter-state case, and while Turkey has announced that it does not intend to comply with the judgment, the Court’s reasoning on the applicability of Article 41 ECHR to inter-state claims and as to how general international law and the Convention interact merits a closer examination.

Article 41 ECHR: an expression of a general principle of international law or a rule of its own?

Helmut Aust has pointed to the seemingly irreconcilable foundations of the judgment: on the one hand, the Court relies on general international law (the law of state responsibility and reparations as well as the law of diplomatic protection) to justify that the just satisfaction-rule also applies to inter-state claims, on the other, the Court submits that it is the individual that is entitled to just satisfaction, not the state (para. 47). By doing so, he argues, the Court renders void its own reasoning that Article 41 is no more than a concretization of the general rule of international law that the breach of an international engagement entails an obligation to make reparation. While this objection to the Court’s reasoning carries considerable weight, I believe that there exists a possible reading of the judgment that allows for accommodating both points, and I submit that the key to such a reading lies in the Court’s characterization of Article 41 being a lex specialis in relation to the general rules and principles of international law (para. 42). If we take the lex specialis principle seriously, then the references to the principles of reparation under general international law and to the law of diplomatic protection could be read as a means of interpretation rather than “rooting” Article 41 in the general law of reparation.

The difficult nature of the lex specialis rule

While it is widely accepted that the lex specialis rule applies in international law, its content is not always clear. In the seminal report of the International Law Commission’s Study Group on fragmentation of international law, two possible variants of the lex specialis rule were distinguished: While a narrow understanding of lex specialis only covers the case where two rules provide incompatible direction on how to deal with a specific set of facts, a broader understanding conceives the lex specialis principle as one that also applies to cases where a specific rule should be “read and understood within the confines or against the background of the general standard, typically as an elaboration” (paras. 56-57). If we accept this broad understanding of lex specialis, it is not harmful that general international law does not conceive of diplomatic protection as being centered on the individual. Rather, we could read the Court’s approach as one that is confined to the Court and deviates or derogates from general international law in this point.

The Court’s use of general international law

But why then did the Court choose to refer to general international law to begin with? I submit that it did so as a means of interpretation of Article 41. Before examining more specific questions of applicability, the Court clarified:

“Despite its specific character as a human rights instrument, the Convention is an international treaty to be interpreted in accordance with the relevant norms and principles of public international law, and, in particular, in the light of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties” (para. 23)

This perception of the ECHR as an instrument of international law is not new. In fact, the Court has reiterated numerous times that the Convention could not be interpreted in a vacuum, but had to take into consideration general international law (e.g. in its judgments in the Al Jedda, Loizidou and Banković cases). However, does that mean that general international law determines the material content of the rule at hand? I submit that the reference to general international law must be seen as a technique of interpretation, rather than a teleological end (a similar distinction can be found here, at p. 622). According to Article 31 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, treaty terms are to be interpreted in accordance with their ordinary meaning, taking into account the context of the treaty, its application and any subsequent agreement between the parties, and, most importantly for my argument here, “any relevant rules of international law applicable in the relations between the parties” (Art. 31 (3) c) VCLT, also known as “systemic integration”). In determining whether Article 41 ECHR is applicable to inter-state claims, the Court uses all of these means of interpretation: it looks at the ordinary meaning of “injured party” (to which just satisfaction can be awarded according to Article 41 ECHR, para. 42 of the judgment), it looks at the application of the provision in previous cases of the Court (only to find that until now, the question has not been answered, para. 39), it looks at the travaux préparatoires, another means of interpretation according to the VCLT (if only a subsidiary means, cf. Art. 32 VCLT). And it also looks at general international law, more specifically at the law of reparations, to emphasize the well-established principle that a state must make reparation where it breaches a treaty obligation. (On an interesting side-note, the Court chooses to refer to an ICJ case – the Gabčikovo Nagymaros judgment – where the ICJ emphasized the importance of the lex specialis principle, cf. para. 132.) Rather than rooting Article 41 ECHR in the general law of state responsibility and ensuing reparation obligations, I submit that the Court uses this reference merely as an interpretative tool. The wording of Monday’s judgment supports such a reading: whenever a reference to general international law is made, the “specific character” or “very nature of the Convention” are immediately highlighted. Coupled with the explicit mentioning of Art. 31 (3) c) VCLT and the explicit mentioning of Article 41 ECHR being lex specialis, I believe that there is good reason to consider the references made by the Court both with regard to the general law of reparation for internationally wrongful acts as well as the reference to the law of diplomatic protection as means of interpretation, as a clarification of the status quo of general international law, from which the Convention (in the Court’s interpretation) then consciously derogates by means of the lex specialis rule.

If we adopt such a reading, two conclusions seem possible: First, the Court does not conceive of itself as the guardian of a self-contained regime or distinct legal system (as a domestic court would normally do, and as the European Court of Justice has done in the past). Rather, it considers the Convention to be part of the international legal system. Second, the Court will apply its own treaty law first, and as lex specialis to any other provision of general international law. Through this approach, the Court tries to embed the Convention within the international legal system without closing it off, using rules of interpretation stemming from the law of treaties, but preserving its unique character as a human rights instrument whose first and foremost end remains the protection of the individual. This is only applicable to its own system, however. To what extent this would also be a contribution to a general shift away from a state-centered approach to a system that places the individual at its center could remain an open question – at least for the Court.


SUGGESTED CITATION  Birkenkötter, Hannah: Some Reflections on the ECtHR’s First Award of Inter-State Satisfaction, VerfBlog, 2014/5/15, https://verfassungsblog.de/reflections-ecthrs-first-award-inter-state-atisfaction/.

2 Comments

  1. Helmut Aust Do 15 Mai 2014 at 19:49 - Reply

    Dear Hannah, excellent post. It is of course possible to understand what the Court did as an exercise in the application of the lex specialis principle.
    My concern – and that was my point in my earlier post – is however, that the Court tries to play down the differences between just satisfaction under Article 41 ECHR and the general rules on reparation. It uses general international law as a tool to interpret the Convention – here I agree – but with a very specific purpose and direction.
    Seen from this perspective, the judgment is indeed another episode in the story of the relationship between the Convention and the Court on the one hand, and general international law on the other. It merits closer attention also with respect to a whole host of other issues …

  2. Hannah Birkenkötter Sa 17 Mai 2014 at 15:16 - Reply

    Thanks for your comment, Helmut, and thank you also for your thoughtful piece earlier this week. I guess we don’t disagree necessarily. Whether or not the Court pursues a specific goal in referring to general international law, I would still argue that the most adequate form of conceptualizing the relationship between the ECHR and general international law would be that of lex specialis. Even if that is so, the question as to what role courts play in the progressive development of international law is of course still unanswered – and I believe it is that role that interests you most when you talk about specific intentions of the Court?

Leave A Comment

WRITE A COMMENT

1. We welcome your comments but you do so as our guest. Please note that we will exercise our property rights to make sure that Verfassungsblog remains a safe and attractive place for everyone. Your comment will not appear immediately but will be moderated by us. Just as with posts, we make a choice. That means not all submitted comments will be published.

2. We expect comments to be matter-of-fact, on-topic and free of sarcasm, innuendo and ad personam arguments.

3. Racist, sexist and otherwise discriminatory comments will not be published.

4. Comments under pseudonym are allowed but a valid email address is obligatory. The use of more than one pseudonym is not allowed.





2 comments Join the discussion
15 Mai 2014

Einige Gedanken zur zwischenstaatlichen Entschädigung beim EGMR

Was ist das Verhältnis zwischen einem regionalen Menschenrechtssystem, etwa dem der Europäischen Menschenrechtskonvention, und allgemeinem Völkerrecht? Diese Frage wird bereits seit geraumer Zeit strittig diskutiert. Auch das am Montag vom Europäischen Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte erlassene Urteil bringt keine eindeutige Antwort.

Am Montag verurteilte das Gericht die Türkei, insgesamt 90 Millionen Euro an die zypriotische Regierung zu zahlen, und zwar für immaterielle Schäden, die Griechisch-Zyprioten während der türkischen Besetzung Nordzyperns 1974 erlitten hatten. Das Urteil muss – darauf wurde hier schon hingewiesen – im Zusammenhang mit einem anderen Urteil des Gerichts aus dem Jahre 2001 gesehen werden. Dort hatte der EGMR mehrere Verstöße der Türkei gegen die in der Konvention verbrieften Rechte festgestellt. Die Frage nach einer gerechten Entschädigung wurde damals allerdings vertagt. Das Urteil vom Montag ist das erste in der Geschichte des EGMR, in dem in einem zwischenstaatlichen Verfahren eine gerechte Entschädigung zugesprochen wurde. Obwohl die Türkei bereits ankündigte, dem Urteil keine Folge zu leisten, ist vor allem die Begründung des Urteils zur Anwendbarkeit des Artikel 41 EMRK auf zwischenstaatliche Verfahren die genauere Analyse wert. Denn das Gericht nutzt traditionelle Auslegungsmethoden des Völkervertragsrechts, um das Verhältnis von allgemeinem Völkerrecht und der Menschenrechtskonvention zu begründen.

Artikel 41 EMRK: Ausdruck eines allgemeinen völkerrechtlichen Prinzips oder eigenständige Regel?

Helmut Aust hat bereits auf die scheinbar unvereinbaren Argumentationsstränge des Urteils hingewiesen: einerseits stützt sich das Gericht auf allgemeines Völkerrecht (nämlich auf den allgemeinen zwischenstaatlichen Reparationsgrundsatz und das Recht des diplomatischen Schutzes), um die Anwendbarkeit der Entschädigungsregel auf zwischenstaatliche Verfahren zu begründen, andererseits stellt das Gericht fest, dass dem Individuum die gerechte Entschädigung zukomme, und nicht etwa dem Staat (Rz. 47). Damit aber ziehe das Gericht seiner eigenen Argumentation, das Recht auf gerechte Entschädigung sei nur eine Ausgestaltung des zwischenstaatlichen Reparationsgrundsatzes, den Boden unter den Füßen weg. Das ist ein gewichtiger Einwand. Dennoch denke ich, dass eine mögliche Lesart des Urteils beide Punkte miteinander vereinen kann: dann nämlich, wenn man die Bezeichnung des Artikel 41 EMRK als lex specialis im Verhältnis zum allgemeinem Völkerrecht (para. 42) ernst nimmt. Dann könnte man die Bezugnahmen auf allgemeine völkerrechtliche Schadensersatzpflichten und das Recht des diplomatischen Schutzes als Interpretationshilfen verstehen, der Artikel 41 wäre aber nicht in ihnen begründet.

Der schwierige Charakter der lex-specialis-Regel

Während auch das Völkerrecht den lex specialis-Grundsatz allgemein anerkennt, ist sein Gehalt nicht immer klar. Der Bericht der Studiengruppe der Völkerrechtskommission zu Fragmentierung im Völkerrecht unterscheidet zwischen zwei Ausprägungen der lex specialis-Regel: Ein enges Verständnis will lex specialis nur anwenden, soweit zwei Bestimmungen einander widersprechende Handlungsanweisungen für eine bestimmte Situation enthalten. Dagegen umfasst ein weiteres Verständnis der lex specialis-Regel auch solche Fälle, in denen die spezielle Rechtsregel „vor dem Hintergrund des allgemeinen völkerrechtlichen Standards gelesen werden muss, typischerweise als Ausprägung“ (Rz. 56-57 des Berichts). Wenn wir ein solch weites Verständnis zugrunde legen, dann ist es unproblematisch, dass das allgemeine Völkerrecht den diplomatischen Schutz als Recht des Staates ansieht, und ihn nicht primär auf das Individuum bezieht. Denn der Ansatz des EGMR wäre dann eben einer, der sich ausschließlich auf das Gericht und den Anwendungsbereich der EMRK bezieht, und insofern als lex specialis gerade vom allgemeinen Völkerrecht abweicht.

Allgemeines Völkerrecht in der gerichtlichen Argumentation

Wenn das so ist, stellt sich aber die Frage, warum der EGMR überhaupt auf allgemeine völkerrechtliche Prinzipien Bezug nimmt. Hätte er dann nicht einfach die Konvention auslegen können? Ich meine, dass das Gericht eben dies tut – und zwar, indem es sich auf allgemeines Völkerrecht beruft.

Bevor einzelne Fragen zur Anwendbarkeit des Artikel 41 auf zwischenstaatliche Verfahren in den Blick genommen werden, stellt das Gericht klar:

“Despite its specific character as a human rights instrument, the Convention is an international treaty to be interpreted in accordance with the relevant norms and principles of public international law, and, in particular, in the light of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties” (para. 23)

Dass die EMRK trotz ihres spezifischen Charakters dem Grunde nach ein völkerrechtlicher Vertrag ist, ist keine neue Erkenntnis. Das Gericht hat in zahlreichen Fällen betont, die EMRK könne nicht in einem Vakuum interpretiert werden, sondern müsse dabei allgemeines Völkerrecht  berücksichtigen (zum Beispiel in den Urteilen Al Jedda, Loizidou und Banković). Aber bedeutet das, dass allgemeines Völkerrecht auch materiellrechtlich auf die Bestimmungen der Konvention durchgreift? Wohl kaum. Die Bezugnahme auf allgemeines Völkerrecht ist in erster Linie Interpretationsmethode, nicht eigenständiger Zweck (eine ähnliche Unterscheidung findet sich hier, S. 622). Gemäß Artikel 31 der Wiener Vertragsrechtskonvention (WVK) sind vertragliche Bestimmungen nach ihrer gewöhnlichen Bedeutung auszulegen, unter Einbeziehung ihres Zusammenhangs, ihrer Anwendung und späteren Übereinkünften zwischen den Vertragsparteien, sowie – und das ist für mein Argument von Bedeutung – unter Berücksichtigung jedes zwischen den Vertragsparteien anwendbaren, einschlägigen Völkerrechtssatzes (Art. 31 (3) c) WVK, auch bekannt als „systemische Integration“). Das Gericht bedient sich aller dieser Auslegungsmethoden: neben der gewöhnlichen Bedeutung des Begriffs „der verletzten Partei“ (Rz. 42 des Urteils; dieser kann nach Art. 41 EMRK eine gerechte Entschädigung zukommen) zieht das Gericht seine eigene Rechtsprechung heran (nur um festzustellen, dass die Frage bislang nicht entschieden wurde, Rz. 39). Es wirft außerdem einen Blick auf die vorbereitenden Arbeiten zur EMRK, ein weiteres (wenn auch nur ergänzendes, vgl. Art. 32 WVK) Auslegungsmittel. Und das Gericht zieht eben auch allgemeine Völkerrechtssätze als Auslegungsmittel heran, insbesondere den allgemeinen Grundsatz, dass eine Vertragsverletzung durch einen Staat eine Schadensersatzpflichtigkeit eben dieses Staates auslöst. (Nur am Rande sei darauf verwiesen, dass der EGMR mit dem Verweis auf das IGH-Urteil im Gabčikovo Nagymaros Fall gerade einen solchen Fall wählt, in dem der IGH den lex specialis-Grundsatz besonders betonte, vgl. Rz. 132.) Das Gericht, so meine ich, verankert also den Artikel 41 EMRK nicht ausdrücklich im allgemeinen völkerrechtlichen Staatenverantwortlichkeits- und Schadensersatzrecht, sondern zieht dieses als Auslegungshilfe heran. Der Wortlaut des Urteils unterstützt diese Lesart: wo immer das allgemeine Völkerrecht bemüht wird, betont das Gericht zugleich auch immer den „spezifischen Charakter“ oder „die Eigenschaft der Konvention“. Auch die Norm des Artikel 31 (3) c) WVK wird ausdrücklich bemüht; ebenso wird betont, dass es sich bei Artikel 41 EMRK eben um lex specialis handelt. Ich meine, daraus lässt sich entnehmen, dass das Gericht in seiner Bezugnahme auf das allgemeine Völkerrecht dessen status quo klarstellen möchte – um sodann unter Anwendung der lex specialis-Regel wissentlich von diesem abzuweichen.

Liest man das Urteil als Anwendung des lex specialis-Grundsatzes, dann scheinen zwei Schlussfolgerungen möglich: Erstens sieht das Gericht sich selbst nicht als Hüterin eines komplett eigenständigen Systems, eines self-contained regime an (anders als das bei nationalen Gerichten, und wohl auch beim Europäischen Gerichtshof, regelmäßig der Fall ist). Sondern es versteht die EMRK als Teil des internationalen Rechtssystems. Zweitens wird das Gericht aber dennoch sein eigenes Vertragsrecht vorrangig anwenden, nämlich als lex specialis gegenüber dem allgemeinen Völkerrecht. Dieser Ansatz erlaubt dem Gericht, die Konvention im internationalen Rechtssystem zu verankern, ohne den Charakter der EMRK als menschenrechtlichen Vertrag, der zuförderst dem Individualschutz verpflichtet ist, zu kompromittieren. Ob und inwieweit all das auch im allgemeinen Völkerrecht vom klassischen staatenzentrierten Ansatz hin zu einem menschenzentrierten System führt, kann dadurch offen bleiben – jedenfalls für das Gericht.

 


SUGGESTED CITATION  Birkenkötter, Hannah: Einige Gedanken zur zwischenstaatlichen Entschädigung beim EGMR, VerfBlog, 2014/5/15, https://verfassungsblog.de/reflections-ecthrs-first-award-inter-state-atisfaction/, DOI: 10.17176/20170216-164844.

Leave A Comment

WRITE A COMMENT

1. We welcome your comments but you do so as our guest. Please note that we will exercise our property rights to make sure that Verfassungsblog remains a safe and attractive place for everyone. Your comment will not appear immediately but will be moderated by us. Just as with posts, we make a choice. That means not all submitted comments will be published.

2. We expect comments to be matter-of-fact, on-topic and free of sarcasm, innuendo and ad personam arguments.

3. Racist, sexist and otherwise discriminatory comments will not be published.

4. Comments under pseudonym are allowed but a valid email address is obligatory. The use of more than one pseudonym is not allowed.




Other posts about this region:
Europa


Other posts about this region:
Europa
No Comments Join the discussion
Go to Top