The Case Against an Autonomous ‘EU Rump Citizenship’

In the debate between Dora Kostakopoulou and Richard Bellamy, I agree with most of the propositions put forward by Dora in her introductory paragraphs: that EU citizenship allows former enemies to meet and live in harmony; that nationalistic populism should be rejected; and that the prospect of Brexit remains depressing. Nonetheless, I disagree with her proposal to move towards an autonomous EU citizenship.

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A relative dissociation of Union citizenship from member States nationality needs to mean something more than long term residence status

Dissociating Union citizenship from Member States nationality law recognizes and consolidates the assumption that people holding a genuine link to the EU have the right to possess its citizenship, regardless of whether their state of residence is willing to offer it to them. I believe that granting the status of European citizenship beyond Member State nationality, in a period noted by the emergence of far-right populism targeting migration as the major threat for European civilizational unity is a win-win solution both for its bearers and the EU itself.

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On Mushroom Reasoning and Kostakopoulou’s Argument for Eurozenship

Dora Kostakopoulou makes a spirited case for an autonomous status of European Union citizenship – one that is not related to the possession of citizenship of a Member State. However, while I sympathise with some of the concerns lying behind this proposal, I regard it as a misguided way of addressing them that is based in its turn on a misunderstanding of the nature of citizenship and of the EU and its achievements – albeit one shared by a number of the EU’s prime actors as well as certain of its foes.

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Who Should Be a Citizen of the Union? Toward an Autonomous European Union Citizenship

Refusing to believe that political constraints outweigh political possibilities in the present historical conjuncture, I argue that the time is ripe for the disentanglement of Eurozenship from Member State nationality. Since the mid-1990s I have defended this reform. But my argument for an autonomous Eurozenship in this debate unfolds in two steps which are presented in the subsequent two sections. In the first section, I explore the incremental disentanglement of EU citizenship from the nationality law of Member States, while in the second section I reconstruct Eurozenship, that is, I present the configuration of an autonomous EU citizenship law which can co-exist with EU citizenship cum Member State nationality.

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1095 Days Later: From Bad to Worse Regarding the Rule of Law in Poland (Part I)

On 13 January 2016, exactly three years ago today, the Commission activated the so-called rule of law framework for the very first time with respect to Poland. As things stand today, Polish authorities’ sustained and systematic attacks on the rule of law now more than ever directly threaten the very functioning of the EU legal order.

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Rationalising political representation within the European Parliament: the Italian Constitutional Court rules on the threshold for the European elections

In December 2018, the Italian Constitutional Court found the national 4% threshold for elections to the European Parliament to be constitutional. Unlike the Bundesverfassungsgericht, which focused in-depth on the European state of affairs at a given stage, the Corte costituzionale has pointed to a gradual evolutionary development towards “a rationalisation of the representation of political forces within the European parliamentary assembly”. According to this interpretation, both the national parliaments and the European Parliament face similar challenges.

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Capturing Bulgaria’s Justice System: The Homestretch

While focusing on other EU members facing challenges in the area of rule of law, foreign commentators may not realize that the situation in Bulgaria is critical. Bulgaria’s executive is now headed into the homestretch of capturing the entire justice system. The current unprecedented proceedings against the President of the Supreme Court of Cassation would complete the capture if the plan that shows through – remove him from office – works.

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Keine Grenzkontrollen im Schengen-Raum! Auch nicht durch Busfahrer

Nach dem Schengener Grenzkodex sind Grenzkontrollen an den Binnengrenzen des Schengen-Raums abgeschafft. Doch die Mitgliedstaaten, allen voran Deutschland, lassen kaum etwas unversucht, diese Vorgabe zu umgehen. Indem sie die Kontrollen ins Hinterland verlagern, behaupten sie ihre „Grenzhoheit“ nach dem Motto: „Wenn wir nicht an der Grenze kontrollieren dürfen, dann kontrollieren wir eben davor oder dahinter.“ Mit Urteil vom 13.12.2018 hat der Europäische Gerichtshof einer besonders kreativen Umgehungstaktik nun den Riegel vorgeschoben: Der Übertragung der Kontrolle auf private Beförderungsunternehmen.

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Zwangshaft für Markus Söder? Von der Ungemütlichkeit an den Grenzen des Rechtsstaats

Mitten in die ohnehin längst nicht mehr beschauliche Vorweihnachtszeit schallten jüngst beunruhigende Nachrichten von einer spektakulären Vorlage des Bayerischen Verwaltungsgerichtshofs an den EuGH. Dürfen oder müssen wir den Bayerischen Ministerpräsidenten in Zwangshaft nehmen lassen? So lautet nur wenig verkürzt die Vorlagefrage. Hintergrund ist der Streit um Dieselfahrverbote in deutschen Innenstädten. Die Vorlage zeugt von einer neuen Ungemütlichkeit an den Grenzen des Rechtsstaates, die das Vertrauen in dessen Berechenbarkeit und Verlässlichkeit zu erschüttern droht.

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