Quarantine, State of Emergency, State of Enforcement, and the Pandemic in Peru

The COVID-19 pandemic and the restrictive measures adopted across Latin America have increased insecurity, suffering and hunger for millions across the region. Although restrictions on free transit, freedom of work, and freedom of assembly, among others, are legitimate – given that social distancing is the only weapon against this virus – we must be aware that millions of people in Latin America survive due to their work in the informal sector. It is unacceptable that for many, the only options during this pandemic are to be killed by hunger or by COVID-19. For this reason, following this emergency, the region must resume a debate about the relevance of a new social or welfare state, without corruption, that can provide basic public services including healthcare.

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History, Memory and Pardon in Latin American Constitutionalism

Do pardons have an effect on crimes against humanity? For the last few days, Peruvian society has been debating the pardon of its former president Alberto Fujimori, who has been convicted of crimes against humanity in 2009. On February 20 at the Max Planck Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte, the Legal Historian and member of the Constitutional Court of Peru, Dr. Carlos Ramos Núñez, presented a crucial intervention on the problems that face the current constitutionalism in Latin America.

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Caudillo-Konstitutionalismus

Kein Kontinent ist freudiger am Werk, wenn es ans Verfassunggeben geht, als Lateinamerika. Unerreichter Spitzenreiter ist die Dominikanische Republik: 32 Verfassungen seit der Staatsgründung 1821. Dann kommt Venezuela mit 26, Haiti mit 24 und Ecuador mit 20 – die letzte davon 2008, stolze 444 Artikel lang und voller wunderbarer Grundrechte wie zum Beispiel dem in […]

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