Leaked Transparency and Whistleblowers

The ability of organisational insiders to speak up and disclose information in the public interest is at the core democratic values. It seems paradoxical then to punish and prosecute those who actively practice them. The time is ripe to establish a legal framework with clear requirements for protected disclosure that affords a wide protection to individuals who expose wrongdoing in the public interest.

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Why Transparency Alone Will Not Suffice To Fight Tax Evasion

I am skeptical about the effectiveness of a shift towards more transparency. I do not believe that this could help overcoming the growing gap between legality and legitimacy in international tax law. Especially, I do not see how the gap can be reduced by making taxpayer information public. Or better, I do not believe this is the right path that States should pursue.

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Iceland’s Citizen Constitution: the Window Remains Wide Open

Iceland is, once again, in political turmoil after the Panama Papers revelations. This might revitalize a project which had fascinated constitutionalists from all over the world before it seemingly was derailed by the political establishment – a new constitution written by the citizens of Iceland themselves.

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The Panama Papers: What Should Be Done?

If the U.S., the European Union, and Japan were to agree to impose a tax on income flows to tax havens, the tax-evasion problem would largely be solved without the need for cooperation from the havens. Using a 30 percent tax will do the trick. What prevents this obvious solution from happening is that the U.S. is willing to aid and abet tax evasion by Europeans, while the EU is willing to aid and abet tax evasion by Americans. This reflects the political power of the rich on both sides of the Atlantic.

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