Is the Reasoning in "Coman" as Good as the Result?

The Court of Justice of the European Union has not always enjoyed the reputation of being particularly LGBT-friendly, but its standing among those pushing for the better protection of rights of same-sex couples is likely to have improved considerably following Coman. While I agree with the substantive result of the decision, I am uncertain if the CJEU’s reasoning is equally convincing. My two main points of critique concern the interpretative techniques applied and the relationship between national identity and fundamental rights.

Continue Reading →

The Federal Rainbow Dream: On Free Movement of Gay Spouses under EU Law

After a pretty disappointing and self-contradictory judgement on the wedding cakes delivered yesterday by the US Supreme Court, the CJEU came up today with the long-awaited decision in the Coman case – putting a thick full stop on a long debate about the interpretation of the term ‘spouses’ under the EU Free Movement Directive. In short, the Court held that the term does cover spouses of the same sex moving to an EU Member State where a gay marriage remains unrecognized. This simple YES is a huge step forward in federalizing the EU constitutional space in a time of multiple crises.

Continue Reading →

Marriage Equality and the German Federal Constitutional Court: the Time for Comparative Law

The enactment of marriage equality in Germany two weeks ago has sparked a constitutional debate that is taking place in Verfassungsblog like in many other media. There will probably be constitutional challenges to the introduction of marriage for same-sex couples in German law at the level of ordinary laws and without amendment of the German Basic Law, because many believe that a constitutional amendment would have been required. Hence, as it very often happens in Germany, the Federal Constitutional Court will very likely have to decide on the question. However, in the international scene of constitutional jurisdictions it will not need to break any ice.

Continue Reading →

„Ehe für alle“ eher nicht: Traditionalismus und Staatshomophobie – Russlands Weg im Umgang mit Diskriminierung

Homophobe Rechtspraktiken in Russland haben eine lange Tradition, die von der russischen Regierung wie auch von der russisch-orthodoxen Kirche bewahrt werden. Das ohnehin schon zerrüttete Verhältnis Russlands zum EGMR wird durch das jüngste Urteil des Gerichtshofes zu einer Verurteilung wegen „Propaganda für Homosexualität“ weiter auf die Probe gestellt.

Continue Reading →

Warum die Ehe für alle vor dem BVerfG nicht scheitern wird (II)

Fällt nach der Einführung der Ehe für alle der grundgesetzliche und der zivilrechtliche Ehebegriff auseinander? Das wäre nicht nur für die Ehe für alle als eine politische Errungenschaft, sondern auch für das Grundgesetz selbst ausgesprochen unglücklich. Wenn der Gesetzgeber in diesem Sinne die Ehe für alle öffnet, kann das dementsprechend den verfassungsrechtlichen Ehebegriff nicht unberührt lassen.

Continue Reading →

Warum die Ehe für alle vor dem BVerfG nicht scheitern wird

Kaum hat der Bundestag das Gesetz über die Öffnung der Ehe beschlossen, wird es schon verfassungsrechtlich diskutiert. Dass das Bundesverfassungsgericht es für verfassungswidrig erklären wird, ist wenig wahrscheinlich. Und das lässt sich auch ohne Rückgriff auf den historischen Willen des Verfassungsgebers überzeugend begründen.

Continue Reading →

Warum das Grundgesetz die Ehe für alle verlangt

Falls der Bundestag am Freitag tatsächlich über die Ehe für alle entscheiden sollte: Steht dann das Grundgesetz einem positiven Votum entgegen? Wollte die verfassungsgebende Gewalt die Ehe für alle für verfassungswidrig erklären? Der historische Wille des Verfassungsgebers gibt dafür bei genauerer Betrachtung nichts her – eher im Gegenteil.

Continue Reading →

Same-sex marriage before the courts and before the people: the story of a tumultuous year for LGBT rights in Romania

This article will briefly recount a particularly agitated year for LGBT rights in Romania, marked by a highly contentious campaign to amend the constitutional definition of marriage through a referendum, as well as the first referral to the Court of Justice of the European Union by the Constitutional Court, in a freedom of movement case involving a married mixed nationality same-sex couple.

Continue Reading →