The Constitutional Siege on Article 370

On August 5, India revoked Article 370, a controversial provision in the Indian Constitution, which happened to be the only link between the State of Jammu & Kashmir and the Indian Union. After its revocation, the Union parliament passed a bill to reorganise the State into two federally administered Union Territories, a move which some have labelled as “illegal occupation” of the State.

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Eurofederalists under Threat: The Latvian Supreme Court’s Ruling on Independence

On 10 April 2019, Latvia’s highest criminal court confirmed a judgment of the Riga Regional Court which convicted the accused for publicly inviting to take action against the national independence of the Republic of Latvia. This decision of the Senate not only contradicts European and international human rights law but is also inconsistent with the case law of Latvia’s Constitutional Court.

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In Praise of Limiting Democracy: a Defense of ISDS

With the UK Parliament debating CETA and the CJEU hearing arguments on the compatibility of EU law with the dispute resolution provisions, investor-state dispute resolution (ISDS) is very much in the news again. Many seem to be concerned about the integrity of the nation state, the ability of the people (within national boundaries) to order and determine their fates. Why should we not view ISDS as a threat to national wellbeing? The reason is that sometimes we need constraints on sovereign discretion.

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Die EU rüstet auf: Außengrenzschutz der nächsten Generation

Als Teil eines umfassenden Legislativpakets schlägt die Europäische Kommission vor, notfalls auch ohne oder gegen den Willen des betroffenen europäischen Küstenstaates EU-Grenzschutzoperationen durchzuführen. Der erwartete Aufschrei potentiell betroffener Staaten zum Erhalt ihrer domaine reservé in Sachen souveräner Grenzsicherung ließ nicht lange auf sich warten. Der Vorschlag bringt zwar einige Neuerungen. Letztendlich vertieft die Kommissionsvision allerdings nur die hybride Grenzschutzstruktur, statt (endlich) den Weg eines konsequenten einheitlichen supranationalen Grenzschutzes einzuschlagen.

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Brexit, Voice and Loyalty: What ‘New Settlement’ for the UK in the EU?

The UK Prime Minister, David Cameron has finally found time to write a letter to the European Council President Donald Tusk setting out the basis for the UK’s renegotiated membership of the EU. Although in recent weeks, European leaders have complained that they lacked clarity as to what it was that Mr Cameron would seek in these negotiations – despite his recent tour of European capitals – in the end, the themes contained in the letter have been well rehearsed both by the Prime Minister, and more recently by the UK Chancellor in his speech to the BDI in Germany. There are four pillars to the ‘new settlement’ sought by the UK government: economic governance, competitiveness, sovereignty and immigration. The Prime Minister’s stated aim is – through voice – for the UK to remain a member of the EU, albeit an EU with differentiated membership obligations. As he reiterated in a speech at Chatham House to trail the letter to Donald Tusk, if he succeeds in his negotiations, the Prime Minister will campaign for the UK to remain in the EU. He also made clear that a vote for Brexit would be just that, with no second referendum to seek a better deal. So what then are the key policy planks supporting the four-pillars?

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