University of Cambridge

Posts by authors affiliated with University of Cambridge

31 Oktober 2023

Responsives Aufenthaltsrecht

In der politischen Debatte um Migration in Deutschland und Europa zirkulieren derzeit kontroverse, wahlweise repressive oder progressive Lösungsvorschlage. Vor dem Hintergrund dieser Debatte unterbreite ich in diesem Beitrag den rechtspolitischen Vorschlag, dem „Vollzugsdefizit“ im asylrechtlichen Bereich mittels individueller Integrationsvereinbarungen in Gestalt öffentlich-rechtlicher Verträge entgegenzuwirken und damit das Aufenthaltsrecht am Beispiel anderer Rechtsgebiete mit Vollzugsschwierigkeiten zu schulen. Individuelle Integrationsvereinbarungen zwischen Behörden und Asylbewerbern eröffnen einerseits einen transparenten Weg zur Regularisierung des Aufenthaltsstatus bei nachgewiesenen Integrationsleistungen. Andererseits erleichtern individuelle Integrationsvereinbarungen Rückführungen, da sie aufenthalts- und asylrechtliche Mitwirkungspflichten (etwa bei Passbeschaffung und Identitätsklärung) auf kooperativem Wege durchsetzen.

Continue reading >>
0
24 Mai 2023
,

Greece’s Ambivalent Turn to Militant Democracy 

On 2 May 2023, the Greek Court of Cassation (Areios Pagos) ruled on the certification of the candidate lists of the political parties that could lawfully participate in the Greek parliamentary elections of 21 May. It refused to certify the participation of the Hellenes National Party, the successor of the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party. The refusal to certify the party breaks away from previous case law on political party certification and indicates a tentative, yet incomplete embrace of militant democracy by a jurisdiction that has traditionally been hostile towards its philosophy.

Continue reading >>
0
30 März 2023

Vorwärts in die klimapolitische Vergangenheit

Seit einiger Zeit ist bekannt, dass die FDP die Rechtsverbindlichkeit der sektorspezifischen Klimaziele im Klimaschutzgesetz gerne abschaffen würde. Mit dieser Forderung scheint sie sich auf dem Koalitionsgipfel nun durchgesetzt zu haben. Zwar wurden im Gegenzug einige konkrete Klimaschutzmaßnahmen vereinbart, doch damit wird aus Klimaschutzperspektive ein Ass im Ärmel gegen einen Spatzen in der Hand getauscht. Die Aufweichung des Klimaschutzgesetzes ist nicht nur ein fataler Fehler, sondern zudem möglicherweise verfassungswidrig.

Continue reading >>
13 Dezember 2022

Den Baum vor lauter Wald nicht sehen – oder umgekehrt?

Das Amtsgericht Flensburg hatte jüngst über die Strafbarkeit eines Klimaaktivisten zu entscheiden, der ein fremdes Grundstück unbefugt betreten hatte, um dort die Rodung eines kleinen Waldstücks zu verhindern. Der Aktivist wurde vom Vorwurf des Hausfriedensbruchs freigesprochen, weil seine Tat dem Klimaschutz gedient habe und damit wegen Notstands (§ 34 StGB) gerechtfertigt sei. Dieser Beitrag wirft einen Blick auf die rechtliche Diskussion um Klimaproteste und um die diesbezüglichen Urteile und wirft dabei zwei Fragen auf: Sollten kleine Beiträge zum Klimaschutz als solche rechtlich anerkannt werden oder nicht? Und: Sind unkonventionelle Klima-Urteile illegitimer ‚richterlicher Aktivismus‘ oder ein Beitrag zur Rechtskultur? Bei beiden Fragen geht es um das Verhältnis vom Kleinen (Protestaktion, Urteil) zum Großen (Klimaschutz, Rechtskultur) und damit letztlich um das Verhältnis zwischen Baum und Wald.

Continue reading >>
23 November 2022

Not Just an Enhanced Opinion Poll

The UK Supreme Court judgment provides a robust protection of reserved matters under the Scotland Act, despite its shortcomings. This will likely end the legal manoeuvring of the Scottish government towards a second referendum. Instead, the political process is back in the driving seat (as it needs to be) and it now appears more likely than ever that the SNP will contest the next general election on an entirely Scottish independence-based platform. The future of the Union and the UK Parliament remains legally and politically precarious.

Continue reading >>
0
29 September 2022

Lessons from the United Kingdom’s „Enemies of the People“ case

It is difficult to deny evidence of a potential backlash against the judiciary in the UK. Both Miller decisions sent shockwaves through the United Kingdom. This is despite both decisions having the effect of protecting the powers of Parliament rather than the courts, and both having a marginal, if any, impact on the ability of the UK government to achieve its desired Brexit outcome. It is hard to forget the ‘Enemies of the People’ headline following the first Miller decision.

Continue reading >>
0
26 September 2022

The Legality of Evil

Lex iniusta non est lex – an unjust law is not a law. This centuries-old legal maxim lies at the heart of Balázs Majtényi's recent Verfassungsblog entry. Majtényi relies on it to challenge the Hungarian legal system. This essay is, however, not concerned with the accuracy of this description, but the utility of Radbruch’s formula when faced with legal systems we deem evil. Here, my answer differs radically from Majtényi’s.

Continue reading >>
06 September 2022

A New European Political Community: The British Perspective

The upcoming State of the Union address scheduled for 14 September and the succession of Liz Truss as UK Prime Minister looks set to be a potential turning point in EU relations. But will the EU grasp it? Could a new intergovernmental political forum – acting alongside EU enlargement – ease the tension of EU treaty change? Such a forum might bridge the potential role prospective EU member states in Eastern Europe could play before formally joining and the necessity of forging a constructive post-Brexit relationship with the UK. It could resolve political and constitutional concerns.

Continue reading >>
19 August 2022
,

Compute and Antitrust

Compute or computing power refers to a software and hardware stack, such as in a data centre or computer, engineered for AI-specific applications. We argue that the antitrust and regulatory literature to date has failed to pay sufficient attention to compute, despite compute being a key input to AI progress and services, the potentially substantial market power of companies in the supply chain, and the advantages of compute as a ‘unit’ of regulation in terms of detection and remedies.

Continue reading >>
0
18 August 2022
,

Effective Enforceability of EU Competition Law Under Different AI Development Scenarios

This post examines whether competition law can remain effective in prospective AI development scenarios by looking at six variables for AI development: capability of AI systems, speed of development, key inputs, technical architectures, number of actors, and the nature and relationship of these actors. For each of these, we analyse how different scenarios could impact effective enforceability. In some of these scenarios, EU competition law would remain a strong lever of control; in others it could be significantly weakened. We argue that despite challenges to regulators' ability to detect and remedy breaches, in many future scenarios the effective enforceability of EU competition law remains strong.

Continue reading >>
0
09 August 2022

Paths Untaken

If the development of certain technologies, such as advanced, unaligned AI, would be as dangerous as some have suggested, a long-termist legal perspective might advocate a strategy of technological delay—or even restraint—to avoid a default outcome of catastrophe. To many, restraint–a decision to withhold indefinitely from the development, or at least deployment, of the technology–might look implausible. However, history offers a surprising array of cases where strategically promising technologies were delayed, abandoned, or left unbuilt, even though many at the time perceived their development as inevitable.

Continue reading >>
0
23 April 2022

Why ‘Partygate’ May Be the Beginning of the End

On 12 April, the UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, and Chancellor, Rishi Sunak, received fixed-penalty notices for breaching Covid regulations, regarding their attendance at a surprise birthday party for the Prime Minister in the Cabinet Room in 10 Downing Street on 19 June 2020. Both paid the fine. Both apologised. Neither resigned. 

Continue reading >>
0
29 März 2022
,

Regulating Recommending: Legal and Policy Directions for Governing Platforms

Digital platforms have strategically positioned themselves as intermediaries between individuals, businesses, organisations, governments, and others. Platform companies frequently adopt business models based around extensively tracking user behaviour and using that information to supply targeted advertising, algorithmically personalise services, and grow user engagement, revenue, and market position. While platform capitalism can be immensely profitable, the problems this brings are increasingly stark. As we have argued elsewhere, it’s time to regulate recommending.

Continue reading >>
0
12 November 2021

Plaumann and the Rule of Law

Most recently, the CJEU sanctioned Poland with daily penalty payments for failing to suspend the operation of its Supreme Court’s disciplinary chamber. The disciplinary chamber’s interference with the independence of judges can have a profound impact on the preliminary reference mechanism as a means for individuals to seek the review of EU law. This must be addressed to safeguard the right to an effective legal remedy under Article 47 CFREU. One possible response may be to modify the Plaumann-test insofar as necessary to protect the functioning of the EU’s ‘complete system of legal remedies’.

Continue reading >>
0