University of New South Wales

Posts by authors affiliated with University of New South Wales

30 October 2023

Justifying a Political Dynasty

The Indonesian Constitutional Court has handed down a highly controversial decision lowering the minimum age requirement for presidential candidacy. It raises further alarms about the Court's independence, as the petitioner sought to allow President Jokowi's son, Gibran Rakabuming Raka, to run in the 2024 presidential elections. Worse, the current Chief Justice is married to the President's younger sister, and the Court's legal reasoning it not sound.

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23 September 2022

The Republic Debate in Australia

With the death of long reigning monarch Queen Elizabeth II, and the ascension of King Charles III, a conversation has been reignited as to whether it is time for Australia to move to a republic. In Australia, this conversation is complicated by the failure of the republic referendum in 1999. The divisions over the model of selecting the Head of State that marred that vote remain unresolved, and there is a distinct lack of any urgency within the broader Australian public.

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21 December 2021

Open Access, Market Power, and Rents

The notion that scientific progress depends on access to the existing stock of knowledge is an old one. It dates to the 12th century when the French philosopher Bernard of Chartres observed: “We are like dwarfs on the shoulders of giants, so that we can see more than they, and things at a greater distance, not by virtue of any sharpness of sight on our part, or any physical distinction, but because we are carried high and raised up by their giant size.”

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14 December 2021

Wie die Überwachung des öffentlichen Raums den politischen Protest in Australien aushöhlt

Während Protestbewegungen auf der ganzen Welt an Schwung gewinnen - von Extinction Rebellion, Black Lives Matter bis hin zu starken Pro-Demokratie-Protesten in Chile und Hong Kong - bauen Regierungen auf der ganzen Welt ihre Überwachungskapazitäten im Namen des "Schutzes der Öffentlichkeit" und der "Bewältigung von Notfällen" aus. Australien ist keine Ausnahme von diesem Trend.

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How Public Space Surveillance is Eroding Political Protests in Australia

As protest movements are gaining momentum across the world, with Extinction Rebellion, Black Lives Matter, and strong pro-democracy protests in Chile and Hong Kong are taking centre stage, governments around the world are increasing their surveillance capacities in the name of “protecting the public” and “addressing emergencies”. Australia is not an exception to this trend.

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10 December 2021
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Toward Restorative Constitutionalism?

How does one restore a democratic constitutional order that has been eroded through a process of “abusive” constitutional change? The same tools used to achieve abusive change can be used to reverse it. For example, just as formal constitutional amendment is one important way in which abusive constitutional projects are carried out, it is also an important pathway through which abusive change can be reversed.

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08 November 2021

Eine Kultur der Ausgrenzung wird in die Extreme getrieben

Seit seinen Anfängen hat Australien seine weitreichenden verfassungsrechtlichen Befugnisse im Bereich der Ausländer- und Einwanderungspolitik genutzt, um ausgrenzende Gesetze zu erlassen. In den zwei Jahrzehnten seit dem 11. September hat die Tendenz zur Ausgrenzung deutlich zugenommen.

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Post-9/11 Australia has pushed a tradition of exclusion to constitutional extremes

Since its earliest days, Australia’s sweeping constitutional powers over aliens and immigration have been drawn on to support broad exclusionary laws. In the two decades since 9/11, the tendency towards exclusion has increased significantly.

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02 June 2021

Procedural Fetishism and Mass Surveillance under the ECHR

On 25th May 2021, the Grand Chamber of the ECtHR ruled in the case Big Brother Watch v. UK that some aspects of the UK’s surveillance regime violated Articles 8 and 10 of the ECHR. Big Brother Watch is the first decision on mass surveillance since the Snowden revelations and sets a standard, grounded in “procedural fetishism”, which endorses the legality of bulk surveillance operations.

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