A Judge Born in the USSR

The Sofia City Court which is notorious for its corruption is currently dealing with its latest scandal which involves the citizenship of the court’s President Alexey Trifonov. There are rising concerns that he is not a Bulgarian citizen – holding Bulgarian citizenship, however, is a requirement to serve as a magistrate in Bulgaria. The answer to a question, which appears to be simple at first glance – what is judge Trifonov’s citizenship? ­– requires the study of USSR and Bulgarian citizenship law applicable in 1972. The issue has already reached Bulgaria’s Supreme Administrative Court and illustrates the deplorable state of Bulgaria’s rule of law.

Continue Reading →

Where Citizenship Law and Data Protection Law Converge

Becoming a citizen of a country is a noteworthy event. But in light of increasing concerns over the protection of personal data, states face questions regarding the necessity of formal publication of the personal data of their new citizens. A closer look at Member States' practices reveals radical discrepancies between the national approaches taken across the EU.

Continue Reading →

„Mama Laudaaa“: der Sommerhit des deutschen Migrationsrechts­diskurses

Während die Sommerferien und die Hitzewelle den Großteil der Bevölkerung in die Badeseen und Freibäder treiben, herrscht in Migrationsrechtskreisen wieder einmal helle Aufregung. Dieses Mal scheint der liberale Verfassungsstaat zu eruieren, weil der Bundestag sich anschickt, einige kleinere Änderungen des Staatsangehörigkeitsrechts zu beschließen. Astrid Wallrabenstein warnte an dieser Stelle kürzlich vor einem „Paradigmenwechsel“. In diesem Blogbeitrag geht es mir um eine inhaltliche Replik auf ihren Beitrag und die Logik des migrationsrechtlichen Diskurses.

Continue Reading →

Die Egalisierungsfunktion der Staatsangehörigkeit

Der Entwurf der Bundesregierung zur Änderung des Staatsangehörigkeitsgesetzes sieht die Ausbürgerung von Deutschen vor, die sich an Kampfhandlungen einer Terrormiliz im Ausland konkret beteiligen. Dies gilt freilich nur für Mehrstaater und bringt damit einen fundamentalen Paradigmenwechsel zum Ausdruck: die Staatsangehörigkeit verliert ihre grundlegende staatsrechtliche Funktion, die darin besteht, Menschen als gleiche Staatsbürger des politisch verfassten Gemeinwesens zu verstehen. So wichtig es ist, dass die Bundesrepublik Deutschland Terrorismus effektiv bekämpft, so wenig darf sie dabei einen Unterschied nach der Staatsangehörigkeit machen.

Continue Reading →

The Citizen, the Tyrant, and the Tyranny of Patterns

Good citizenship cannot be captured or fixed by an algorithm, because: (1) people genuinely disagree about what good citizenship is; (2) there are limits to how any conception of good citizenship can be enforced in states that uphold the rule-of-law; and (3) even the best scheme of algorithmic citizenship would fail to achieve its objectives due to the inherent weaknesses of applying algorithms to social affairs.

Continue Reading →

Staatsangehörigkeit in Geiselhaft

Auf den ersten Blick wirkt der Gesetzentwurf der Bundesregierung zum Verlust der Staatsangehörigkeit für Terror-Kämpfer im Ausland als hilfloser Umgang mit Personen, die ein militärisches Gewaltpotential an den Tag gelegt haben. Auf den zweiten Blick offenbart er aber eine Abkehr von der Essenz moderner Staatsangehörigkeit. Sie besteht in der fundamentalen Gleichheit der Staatsbürger, die durch diesen Status formalisiert wird.

Continue Reading →

The Tjebbes Fail: Going Farcical about Bulgakovian Truths

In the case of Tjebbes the European Court of Justice has agreed in principle with stripping EU citizens residing abroad of their EU citizenship status and EU democratic rights based on non-renewal of the passport. The judgment showcases the dangerous limits to the understanding of the concept of citizenship by the Grand Chamber of the Court of Justice.

Continue Reading →

Systemic Error – On Hungary’s Extension of European Voting Rights to Non-Resident Citizens

Last December, the Hungarian legislator adopted a rule that allows non-EU-resident Hungarian citizens to vote at the European Parliament elections. This rule is in line with a 2018 Council decision. Implementation done, EU conformity secured, nothing to see here. Or is there?

Continue Reading →

A Citizenship Maze: How to Cure a Chronic Disease?

European Union (EU) citizenship is in crisis. If the Eurozenship debate, composed of experts on EU citizenship, is analogized to a doctor’s diagnosis, the outcome is more extensively polarized than initially thought—a chronic disease, not just a temporary disorder. As I follow the debate, it is no longer clear what the problem is—there seem to be too many, real and imaginary—or how to heal it. Some issues seem to be “genetic,” part of the EU’s DNA, yet others resemble a concrete illness that may be cured, so the argument goes, by a “doctor’s prescription,” which in law means a legal design.

Continue Reading →