Drama or Serenity? Upcoming Judicial Appointments at the Slovak Constitutional Court

2018 is shaping up to be one of the most important years in the history of the Slovak Constitutional Court (SCC). Nine of the currently sitting 13 judges will see their non-renewable terms expire in February 2019. The new appointments have the potential to be shrouded in drama, as they will take place against the background of a constitutional and political power struggle over SCC appointments between the President and the government, as well as broader judicial malaise in the country.

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The EU as the Appropriate Locus of Power for Tackling Crises: Interpretation of Article 78(3) TFEU in the case Slovakia and Hungary v Council

The CJEU’s judgment in Slovakia and Hungary v Council of 6 September 2017 raises important instutional questions. As the Court implicitly recognises the EU as the appropriate forum for taking effective action to address the emergency situation created by a sudden inflow of third country nationals, it adopts its tendency towards purposive and effectiveness-oriented jurisprudence to asylum law.

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“Unrichtiges Recht” in Slovakia? The Radbruch Formula and Positive Law from the Nineties

While the Slovak Parliament might not be the most obvious place to look for a (modest) rerun of the classic legal dilemma about unjust laws, constitutional enthusiasts might want to tune in for once, as the National Council (the official name of the assembly), was in recent weeks the site of a reinvigorated effort to invalidate amnesties granted in the late 1990s by the once aspiring authoritarian Vladimír Mečiar. The government has not yet reached a consensus but the impending vote holds more promise than the previous seven attempts.

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Hungarians outside Hungary – the twisted story of dual citizenship in Central and Eastern Europe

In 2010, Hungary amended its Citizenship Act to pave the way for a preferential naturalisation of Hungarians living abroad. This was met with great alarm among Hungary’s neighbours: As a consequence of the Trianon Peace Treaty in the aftermath of World War I, by which Hungary lost large swaths of its territory, a considerable part of the citizenship of Romania, Slovakia, Serbia, Ukraine and other states nowadays consists of ethnic Hungarians. Four years after, tensions between Hungary and its neighbours with respect to dual citizenship are still palpable, since the number of new Hungarian citizens increases continually and already exceeds half million.

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Keine Freizügigkeit für Staatsoberhäupter

László Sólyom ist ein Bürger der Europäischen Union und hat als solcher das Recht, aus seinem Heimatland Ungarn in die Slowakei zu reisen, wann immer er das möchte. Er muss nur seinen Ausweis vorlegen, dann müssen die Slowaken ihn reinlassen. Das befiehlt ihnen Art. 21 AEUV. Nun war Herr Sólyom 2009 nicht nur Unionsbürger, sondern […]

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EU-Recht setzt Ungarns Isolation Grenzen (aber sehr, sehr weite)

EU-Mitgliedsstaaten müssen sich nicht vertragen. Aber ihr Streit darf nicht so weit gehen, dass sie nicht mehr miteinander reden. Zu diesem Schluss kommt Generalanwalt Yves Bot in seinen heute veröffentlichten Schlussanträgen in einem Fall, der sich – jawohl – um Ungarn dreht. Genauer gesagt dreht er sich um den ehemaligen Staatspräsidenten László Sólyom: Dieser wollte […]

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