Constitutional Exceptionalism in Kashmir

The move of India’s President to abrogate Article 370 has been subject to much academic debate and discourse along the doctrinaire lines and limits of traditional constitutional law. Since the Declaration was passed, however, in a state of exception, the consequent legal vacuum necessitates an analysis in light of both political facts and public law.

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Did Turkey’s Recent Emergency Decrees Derogate from the Absolute Rights?

Following a coup attempt by a small group in the Turkish Armed Forces in 2016, the Turkish Government declared a state of emergency for three months. Although it observed procedural rules laid down by national and international law on declaring a state of emergency, the Government’s use of the emergency powers contradicts non-derogable rights laid down in the Turkish Constitution, the ICCPR and the ECHR.

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Klimanotstände

Am 28. Juni hat der Bundestag über einen Antrag der Fraktion der Linken mit dem Titel „Klimanotstand anerkennen – Klimaschutz-Sofortmaßnahmen verabschieden, Strukturwandel sozial gerecht umsetzen“ beraten. Das Vorhaben irritiert aus verschiedenen Gründen. Erstens aufgrund der gewählten Notstandsrhetorik, die nach Ansicht vieler doch vorderhand dem Arsenal der traditionell exekutivfreundlichen politischen Rechten zuzuordnen ist. Zweitens wegen des Widerspruchs von Sofortmaßnahmen, die keinen Aufschub dulden, und der Maßgabe der sozial gerechten Umsetzung eines „Strukturwandels“.

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A National Emergency on the Border?

Declarations of emergency are in bad odor in modern constitutional democracies. the U.S. Constitution makes no provision for emergency declarations. And while the Constitution’s guidance is cryptic at best on many separation-of-powers issues, it couldn’t be clearer that Congress—not the President—has the power to appropriate funds. So: can he really do that? The better argument is that he cannot, but it’s not so open-and-shut a matter as you might suppose.

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Save the Constitution!

India’s oppositional Congress party wants to impeach Dipak Misra, the Chief Justice of India, who stands accused of allocating cases to the respective benches at his own, politically right-leaning whim. In its fight against the governing BJP party, the Congress party has launched a "Save the Constitution!" campaign. Unfortunately, its leader Rahul Ghandi’s family has a history of entanglement with the constitution of its own.

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Why Do We Need International Legal Standards for Constitutional Referendums?

Important substantive and institutional guarantees ensure the democratic quality of the general elections. In the case of a referendum these substantive and procedural guarantees are almost completely missing. Only international soft law deals with the question of the democratic quality of the referendum. Recent experience with Turkey, Hungary and other places show that this needs to change.

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