POSTS BY Ralf Michaels

Is Brexit a Game?

Can Boris Johnson’s and Dominic Cumming’s Brexit strategy be made plausible by means of game theory? I think not. It seems too simple to present the current situation as a two-party game, with the UK (or Boris Johnson) on one side and the EU on the other. In reality, Johnson faces two opposite players—one being the EU, the other the hard Brexit opponents and the Supreme Court at home.

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Gehört der Islam zu Deutschland? Beyond Böckenförde

Kritik an der CSU und ihrem Eifer, dem Islam die Zugehörigkeit zu Deutschland abzusprechen, ist ebenso angebracht wie leicht. Schwieriger, aber mindestens ebenso wichtig, ist es, genauer zu analysieren, wie sich diese Position zum liberalen Staat verhält, so wie wir ihn heute verstehen. Das soll hier geschehen, mit Schwerpunkt auf das Werk von Ernst Wolfgang Böckenförde, das für das deutsche Selbstverständnis in diesen Fragen prägend ist.

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Courage to be wrong, or education to get it right? A response to Michaela Hailbronner

Michaela Hailbronner makes important arguments in her informed and carefully balanced post. I agree with much of what she says. I just think the main problem of interdisciplinarity in Germany is not lack of courage. It is lack of expertise. Much of her analysis strikes me as sound. I would agree that many US law […]

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Culture, Institutions, and Comparison of Legal Education and Scholarship—A Response to Rob Howse

In a post on verfassungsblog.de I compare two reports on legal education and scholarship: one concerning Germany from the German Council on Science and Humanities (Wissenschaftsrat), the other concering the United States from a task force of the American Bar Association. I find the Wissenschaftsrat’s decision to maintain an emphasis on doctrinal reasoning, while promoting […]

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“Law as the Study of Norms” – Foundational Subjects and Interdisciplinarity in Germany and the United States

The German Council of Science and Humanities’ report on “Prospects of Legal Scholarship in Germany. Current Situation, Analyses, Recommendations” has sparked a lively debate amongst legal scholars in Germany on how to adapt legal education and legal scholarship to the challenges of increasing internationalization of the law. The first contribution to our symposium on Prospects of […]

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