Can Greece lawfully extradite the eight Turkish soldiers to Turkey?

Turkey demands the extradition of eight Turkish soldiers who fled to Greece on Saturday 16 July after Friday’s failed coup, using an army helicopter. The key question is whether they would face a ‘real risk’ of ill-treatment contrary to Art. 3 ECHR. I tentatively conclude that such real risk is made out.

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Calling Europe into Question: the British and the Greek referenda

On this day last year, Greeks woke up facing a referendum result that very few had expected. Almost a year later, on the 24th of June 2016, British and other Europeans woke up overwhelmingly surprised by the ‘Leave’ vote. Despite their significant differences, the Greek and the British referenda have some important things in common. Reading them together might have something to teach us about referenda on the EU—especially now that more people seem to be asking for one in their own country.

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Rule of law in Greece buckles under institutionalised ill-treatment by law enforcement agents

Rampant police violence, institutionalized racism and a „culture of impunity“: The Council of Europe Anti-Torture Committee’s latest report on Greece reveals once again a shocking lack of respect for human rights and the rule of law in the Greek law enforcement system.

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Im Spiegelkabinett des Parlamentarismus – Macht und Ohnmacht der europäischen Bürgervertretungen

Einziger Tagesordnungspunkt des Bundestages auf seiner Sondersitzung am 19. August 2015 war die Zustimmung zum dritten Hilfspaket für Griechenland. Wieder einmal hat ganz Europa auf ein nationales Parlament geschaut und sich gefragt, ob es dem Weg zustimmen wird, den die Gubernativen Europas ausgehandelt haben. Dabei stellt sich die grundsätzliche Frage, welche Rolle Parlamenten überhaupt zukommen kann, zukommen soll, wenn die zugrundeliegenden politischen Projekte gekennzeichnet sind durch Inter- und Transnationalität, große Geheimhaltung und oftmals Zeitdruck. Die These ist: Es zeigen sich widersprüchliche Tendenzen in Europa. Einerseits gewinnen Parlamente an Bedeutung – während das Bundesverfassungsgericht eine Stärkung des deutschen Parlamentarismus vorgibt, stärkt sich das Europäische Parlament aus eigener Kraft. Die Wertschätzung für das Prinzip Parlamentarismus findet andererseits aber in der politischen Realität zur Zeit dort ihre Grenzen, wo die Bürgervertretung ein „Nehmer-Land“ repräsentiert.

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Greece: a constitutionalist’s two (euro)cents.

Greece is obviously at the forefront of many EU scholars’ minds over the past number of weeks. There has been an avalanche of commentary and analysis on the Greek bailout negotiations both from those with intimate knowledge of the situation and familiarity with Greek politics, the EMU and sovereign debt crises as well speculation from the sidelines from those of us more ignorant of these matters. Therefore as someone whose credibility in the debate (such as it is) is limited to the expertise of the constitutional lawyer with a good familiarity of EU law generally, I have limited my two (euro)cents on the topic to a number of (mostly factual) propositions related to the crisis for what they are worth. Most I think are obvious and (hopefully) few are contentious but I think that they are worth (re)stating in the context of the war of words and recrimination from all sides present in the debate in recent days.

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The Euro Summit deal: defeat or victory? A response to Robert Howse

Avoiding Grexit is, of course, the important achievement of the Agreement. But this counts as a success no more than surviving self-inflicted wounds: Concrete discussions on Grexit revived only in the last months and especially after the recent referendum. They are actually the product of the negotiation strategy itself. If we are looking for success then, we are left with debt relief and the new conditionality.

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Damned if you do, Damned if you don’t: Reflections on Brexit and Grexit

Greece might leave the Euro zone, the UK might leave the European Union, Scotland might leave the UK. The naif belief that the market will fix inequality and take care of political unity will have to face reality: Equality and solidarity are not provided by the market, nor are they to be expected without governing institutions. Either there is a clear vision that binds together countries by providing safety nets and solidarity. Or the union will break apart.

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The Deal on Greek Debt: Political Gamechanger for Europe, Tactical Retreat (not Surrender) by Tsipras

The conventional wisdom, delivered before anyone could really ponder the fine print of the Greek debt deal, is that Tsipras surrendered to the creditors in a humiliating defeat. His referendum and prior tenacity in negotiations proved futile,according to the predominant account that has emerged in the media and the twitter and blog worlds. Wrong on all counts. And here’s why.

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„Haircut“ für Griechenland? (Un-)mögliche Frisuren eines Schuldenschnitts

Die Euro-Regierungschefs wollen Griechenland offenbar mit verlängerten Kreditlaufzeiten und niedrigeren Zinsen helfen, im Euro bleiben zu können. Solange eine Rückzahlungspflicht der Nominalschuld bestehen bleibt, ist eine solche Form des „Haircuts“ wohl europarechtlich zulässig – anders als ein tatsächlicher Schuldenschnitt.

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Eine Schuldenrestrukturierung setzt keinen Grexit voraus!

Bundesfinanzminister Wolfgang Schäubles Behauptung, Griechenland könne wegen Art. 125 AEUV nur außerhalb der Eurozone seine Schulden gegenüber anderen Euro-Staaten und EFSF bzw. ESM restrukturieren, beruht auf einem Denkfehler, wenn nicht gar auf einem Taschenspielertrick. Die Pringle-Rechtsprechung des EuGH zeigt: Das Europarecht schaufelt sich nicht sein eigenes Grab. Man muss es nicht erst umgehen, um die Ziele der Union wahrhaft zu verwirklichen.

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