Black Lives and German Exceptionalism

Racism is not limited to anti-blackness nor restricted to the context of policing; however, I use policing and blackness as touchstones for this commentary precisely because this constellation of race and law is consistently thought to present a problem exceptional to the United States. It is not. This article examines the case of police brutality. The nature of policing, not only in the United States but in many places in the world, and certainly in Europe, is such that holding police to account for the deaths of innocent people is not only statistically improbable, but it is designed to be legally impractical.

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Mehr als ‘Identitätspolitik’

Wie bei allen Protestbewegungen stellt sich auch für Black Lives Matter und #metoo die Frage, welche Bedeutung sie für etablierte politische Akteure und Parteien haben. Ein Blick aus politikwissenschaftlicher Perspektive zeigt, dass es vor allem für sozialdemokratische und andere progressive Parteien zentral ist, Protestbewegungen wie Black Lives Matter zu integrieren, wenn sie nicht in der Bedeutungslosigkeit verschwinden wollen.

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One day (Vandaag) …

Yes I do … have a migration background. Yet, due to mere genetic randomness, my “Germanness” has hardly ever been challenged – at least until the moment when it comes to the correct spelling of my family name: “KHan” not “KaHn” – Dschinghis, not Oliver – please! Occasionally, I still get carried away with coquetting in my lectures: “I would be inclined to say – I am a case of successful integration.” Some students may then be slightly embarrassed, in particular after a controversial discussion about immigration policy. But that’s it basically, my personal home story about “racism”! But to be very clear and unambiguous: my father’s story is a much longer and a much more painful one! But that’s another story.

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Parity laws in Germany – Caving in to Gender Backlash or Consolidating Women’s Citizenship Status?

In this contribution we examine the German developments in light of broader European debates. Though we believe that the German Basic Law can support stronger arguments for parity laws in representative political institutions, we do not need to make such stronger arguments here to defend the constitutionality of parity laws. For what is at stake is ultimately a question of legislative discretion: whether German legislatures are allowed to pass parity laws as a matter of state and federal constitutional law. Such legislative discretion is particularly appropriate where the constitutional text itself provides no clear standards, academic commentators disagree and where – as in this case – there exists a significant European trend towards adopting gender quotas with regional and international institutions repeatedly encouraging the adoption of such laws.

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Wird der Bremer Polizei nun auf die Finger geschaut?

Die Ausweitung polizeilicher Befugnisse im neuen Bremer Polizeigesetz ist vergleichsweise moderat ausgefallen. Zahlreiche in jüngerer Zeit bundesweit publik gewordene Skandale lassen jedoch vermuten, dass der Polizeiapparat Rassismus, Sexismus, Gewaltexzesse und das Vorgehen gegen ohnehin marginalisierte Gruppen wenn nicht gar strukturell begünstigt, so doch jedenfalls deren effektive Aufklärung erschwert. Der Bremer Entwurf enthält allerdings verschiedene Instrumentarien zur Kontrolle und rechtsstaatlichen Einhegung dieser Probleme.

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COVID-19: Walking the Tightrope of Vaccination Obligations

Normally, outside states of public health emergency, many countries employ some type of vaccination coercion scheme to encourage uptake. The range of possible measures, including monetary incentives, social exclusion, fines, and criminal penalties, fall on a spectrum from voluntary to strictly mandatory. Given the power and efficacy of vaccinations, many nations have adopted varying approaches to compelling vaccination against emergent public health threats. Specifically, this article examines the legal and historical orientation of mandatory vaccination in the US and Germany.

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Wann kommt der Abschiebungsstopp?

In der COVID-19-Pandemie erweist sich die Situation Geflüchteter hierzulande wie anderswo als besonders prekär. Verschärft wird dies nicht zuletzt dadurch, dass der Zugang zu Rechtsberatung aktuell erheblich erschwert ist. Gleichwohl werden vollziehbar Ausreisepflichtige nach wie vor abgeschoben und zwar auch in Herkunftsstaaten, die ebenfalls von der Pandemie betroffen sind. Ist es an der Zeit für ein nationales Abschiebungsverbot oder wenigstens einen Abschiebungsstopp?

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Why Egenberger Could Be Next

Soon, the Federal Constitutional Court will decide on the Egenberger case that raises important questions at the intersection of anti-discrimination law and religious policy. The decision is an opportunity to address critical questions to the European Court of Justice – a court that lacks dogmatic subtlety and sensitivity with regard to religion and cultural policy as an analysis of its case law shows.

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Fight, flight or fudge?

Karlsruhe’s latest judgement on the PSPP moves the German state closer to a full-fledged fight with either the EU or its own Constitutional Court by threatening to prohibit Germany’s participation in a programme that has existential significance for the euro. To resolve this dilemma, perhaps nothing short of a revolutionary moment would be required.

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