The Quest for Trump’s Taxes Heads to the Supreme Court

Donald J. Trump is an open book in many respects, but not when it comes to his federal income taxes. Every major party presidential candidate since 1976 has released his tax returns, and candidate Trump pledged that he would do so as well – yet the promised Form 1040 has not been forthcoming. It remains to be seen, however, whether President Trump can keep his tax returns under wraps in the face of a number of efforts to uncover them currently wending their way through U.S. courts.

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Trumps Supreme Court und der Schwanger­schafts­abbruch

Mit der Ernennung des umstrittenen Richters Kavanaugh hat US-Präsident Trump am US Supreme Court eine dauerhafte konservative Mehrheit installiert. Anfang Oktober hat der Supreme Court den Fall June Medical v. Gee zur Entscheidung angenommen. Der Fall aus Louisiana könnte mitten im Wahljahr eine Kehrtwende in der Rechtsprechung des Supreme Courts zu Schwangerschaftsabbrüchen einleiten.

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Impeaching a President: how it works, and what to expect from it

Metaphors abound in discussing how dramatically the issue of presidential impeachment has become central in U.S. political discourse: a simmering kettle boiled over, the Whistle Blower blew the lid off efforts to conceal scandalous (almost treasonous) presidential behavior. And everyone notes that what has been revealed is almost certainly matched by information that will come out sooner rather than later. It’s not possible to summarize the state of play because relevant events occur almost hourly. Here I’ll offer a primer on presidential impeachment in the United States for readers who might not be familiar with the basics, then offer some comments about presidential impeachment in comparative constitutional law.

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Acquiescing in Refoulement

The judgment of the US Supreme Court issued on Wednesday (Attorney General v. East Bay Sanctuary Covenant) purports to be simply procedural: It overturns a lower court injunction that prevented President Trump’s unilateral “safe third country” rule from coming into force before its legality is tested on the merits. But in truth, the Supreme Court knowingly acquiesced in the refoulement of refugees arriving at the US southern border.

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König Midas, Hauptmann Kettensäge und die Mittel des Völkerrechts zum Schutz der Biodiversität

Spätestens seit der Veröffentlichung des UN Global Assessment Report im Mai 2019 wissen wir, dass etwa eine Million der insgesamt acht Millionen Arten vom Aussterben bedroht sind – mehr als jemals zuvor in der Geschichte unseres Planeten. Das sechste globale Massensterben von Tieren und Pflanzen erfordert ein konzertiertes Vorgehen der internationalen Staatengemeinschaft. Doch nationale Alleingänge, wie des US-Präsidenten Trump und seines brasilianischen Amtskollegen Bolsonaro, nehmen zugunsten der heimischen Wirtschaft unwiederbringliche Verluste der Artenvielfalt in Kauf, die den Bestand der Ökosysteme weltweit gefährden. Welche Mittel hält das Völkerrecht bereit, um dem entgegenzuwirken?

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Overruling Roe v. Wade?

Following President Trump’s appointment of Justices Gorsuch and Kavanaugh the question has arisen as to whether, in the coming years, the U.S. Supreme Court will overrule its seminal judgment in Roe v. Wade. Roe established a woman’s fundamental right to choose to have an abortion before the viability of the fetus. The question of Roe’s destiny appears more pressing today than ever before because reversing the case has formed part of President Trump’s successful political platform.

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Bei uns doch nicht! Oder doch?

Wahlkreismanipulationen erschüttern die repräsentative Demokratie in ihren Fundamenten. Trotzdem will der US Supreme Court dagegen nichts unternehmen. Ein rein amerikanisches Problem? Keineswegs. Auch die deutschen Wahlsysteme bieten Anreizstrukturen für "Gerrymandering", wenngleich diese etwas subtiler sind als in den USA.

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What to expect when you’re not expecting- Abortion backlash in the US and constitutional standards

Roe v Wade- the US Supreme Court Case that has been on everyone’s lips since the appointment of Justice Brett Kavanaugh, if not since the assumption of presidency by Donald Trump. The case from 1973 is known for having established the right to an abortion and is now the center of legal and political debate around the reproductive health of those, who are able to get pregnant. The debate is being fueled by a number of states passing so-called heartbeat bills and other restrictive legislation, whereas Alabama has not only joined in on the trend but has introduced the harshest bill yet, criminalizing abortion altogether. In light of these current events, the following takes a look at the constitutional development of the right to terminate a pregnancy and its implications for current laws.

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