Could there be a Rule of Law Problem at the EU Court of Justice?

The Member States’ current plan of replacing the sitting U.K. Advocate General at the Court of Justice Eleanor Sharpston before the end of her six-year term raises a serious question whether doing so may violate the European Treaties. If yes, this would be a troubling intrusion on the independence of the Court and the constitutional structure of the Union – just when the EU should be setting an example for the Member States (both current and former).

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Junqueras’ Immunity: An Example of Judicial Dialogue

There is no doubt that the criminal prosecution of the "Catalan question" is a stress test for Spanish Justice. One of the last episodes, now with a European dimension, has been the "euro-immunity" of Junqueras. And, in this respect, the political and journalistic readings of the judicial decisions issued by the Spanish Supreme Court and by the Court of Justice of the European Union emphasize the confrontation. However, in my modest opinion, I believe that these decisions are an example of dialogue between courts, necessary to manage the current pluralism where legal orders are intertwined without clear hierarchies.

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Brexit and the CJEU: why the Opinion of the Court Should be Sought as a Matter of Emergency

With the comfortable majority he managed to secure in the Commons, Boris Johnson is now very likely to be able to push through the British Parliament the withdrawal agreement he negotiated with the European Union back in October. Provided that the European Parliament greenlights it quickly enough, it may well come into force by 31 January 2020, deadline of the last extension decision agreed between the EU-27 and the UK. However, one actor of the process seems to have been forgotten: the Court of Justice of the European Union. This could end up being a huge mistake.

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Existenzminimum nach Luxemburger Art

Leistungen zur Gewährleistung eines menschenwürdigen Lebensstandards sind unantastbar. Das hat die große Kammer des EuGH in der Rs Haqbin (C-233/18) am 12. November 2019 für das Flüchtlingssozialrecht entschieden. § 1a des Asylbewerberleistungsgesetzes wird den Anforderungen des EuGH nicht gerecht, und das BVerfG könnte am Ende den Kürzeren ziehen, wenn es die Rechtsprechung des EuGH nicht berücksichtigt.

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The Power of ‘Appearances’

Last week the EU Court of Justice replied to Polish Supreme Court’s preliminary references regarding the independence of judges of its Disciplinary Chamber. The good news is that the ECJ gave to all Polish courts a powerful tool to ensure each citizen’s right to a fair trial before an independent judge, without undermining the systems of judicial appointments in other Member States. The bad news is that the test of appearance may easily be misused or abused.

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Außenpolitik statt Verbraucherschutz

Nach dem Urteil des EuGH vom 12. November lautet die korrekte und verpflichtende Herkunftskennzeichnung für einen Wein, der aus dem Westjordanland stammt und in einer israelischen Siedlung hergestellt wird: „Westjordanland (israelische Siedlung)“. Der EuGH sendet mit diesem Urteil nicht nur ein politisch fragwürdiges Signal, sondern er überschreitet auch seine Kompetenzen. Der Bundestag und die Bundesregierung dürfen an der Umsetzung des Urteils daher nicht mitwirken.

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The Judgment That Will Be Forgotten

On September 24 2019, the ECJ delivered its judgment in Google vs CNIL (C-517/17) which was expected to clarify the territorial scope of the ‘right to be forgotten’. In fact, the ECJ’s decision is disappointing in several respects. The Court does not only open the door to fragmentation in European data protection law but also fails to further develop the protection of individual rights in the digital age.

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On the Rule of Law Turn on Kirchberg – Part II

The times of constitutional crisis call for a more robust approach to institutions and their respective spheres of competence and expertise. Courts of law are in the business of enforcing the rule of law. The European Court of Justice must currently rely on the unwritten and implicit understandings of the constitution to fulfill its task.

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On the Rule of Law Turn on Kirchberg – Part I

What came to be generically known as “the rule of law crisis” in the European Union has led the European Court of Justice to add a new chapter to its own jurisprudential tradition. Since 2017, the Court has been laying the foundations for a jurisprudential paradigm shift in order to defend the integrity of the EU legal system and it can thereby rely on the functions that the EU Treaties confer upon it.

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Das Ende der Maut, wie wir sie kennen

Zur PKW-Maut hat der Europäische Gerichtshof nun ein wunderbar klares Urteil gesprochen, das auf eindrückliche Weise bestätigt, was jeder sehen konnte, der es sehen wollte: Ob ich bei der Erhebung einer Abgabe zwischen Personen, die in Deutschland wohnen, und solchen, die woanders wohnen, differenziere (klar verboten, grundlegende ständige Rechtsprechung) oder ob ich sie bei der Erhebung gleichbehandle und dann nur den in Deutschland Ansässigen alles erstatte, darf nicht zu einem unterschiedlichen Ergebnis führen.

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