Towards a Reform in Lebanon? Interview with the President of the Constitutional Council ISSAM SLEIMAN

The Lebanese political system, based on the principle of confessional parity, is notoriously complex and rigid. In May, after years of gridlock due to sectarian strife, a new parliament was elected. But the fundamental problems remain unsolved. Issam Sleiman, the President of the Constitutional Council, has proposed a reform of enable the Constitutional Council to settle conflicts about the interpretation of the constitution.

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Wurde Ali B. rechtswidrig aus dem Irak nach Deutschland geholt?

Nun, wo die „Heldenpolizisten“ in die Heimat zurückgekehrt sind, geht das Drama um den gewaltsamen Tod der 14-jährigen Susanna in den dritten Akt. Was war das eigentlich rechtlich, das da am vergangenen Samstag in Erbil geschah und letztlich zur Festnahme des Tatverdächtigen Ali B. durch die Bundespolizei führte? Eine „Auslieferung“? Eine „Abschiebung“? Oder doch ein „Rechtsverstoß“ oder „Freiheitsberaubung“?

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Karlsruhe und das Beamtenstreikverbot – Dialogangebot mit Dolch im Gewande?

Insgesamt halte ich die Karlsruher Entscheidung für überwiegend gelungen. Indem sie die konventionsrechtlichen Wertungen aktiv aufnimmt, vermeidet sie den teilweise aus der Görgülü-Entscheidung herausgelesenen konfrontativen Unterton gegenüber dem Straßburger Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte. Das ist in Zeiten, wo manche Mitgliedsstaaten durchaus auf Konfrontation gegenüber Straßburg gehen, ein über die Grenzen Deutschlands hinaus wichtiges Signal.

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“Academics for Peace“ and their Freedom of Expression

The ‘Academics for Peace Petition’, published in January 2016, was signed by around two thousand academics from both Turkey and from abroad. The petition raised concerns, using strong language, about the conduct of Turkish security forces in their counter-terrorism operations carried out in response to violent actions by the PKK terrorist group and their supporters  in south-east Turkey in the summer of 2015. One signatory,  Füsun Üstel, professor of political science, was found guilty of committing the crime of terrorist propaganda under Article 7(2) of the Turkish Counter Terrorism Law and now faces fifteen months of imprisonment. The constitutional protection of Üstel’s freedom of expression has not been respected by the court in its judicial reasoning. 

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Dusting off the Old Precedent – Why the Commission Must Stick to the Art. 7 Procedure Against Poland

Here we go again. The reports are resurfacing that the Commission is ready to back away from the Article 7 procedure that was initiated against Poland last December. Should we be surprised? For anybody who vaguely follows the Commission’s vanishing act, the answer must be a resounding „no”. Instead, the analysis that follows offers a journey back in time and argues that the past teaches us some important lessons and … rhymes.

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Is the Reasoning in "Coman" as Good as the Result?

The Court of Justice of the European Union has not always enjoyed the reputation of being particularly LGBT-friendly, but its standing among those pushing for the better protection of rights of same-sex couples is likely to have improved considerably following Coman. While I agree with the substantive result of the decision, I am uncertain if the CJEU’s reasoning is equally convincing. My two main points of critique concern the interpretative techniques applied and the relationship between national identity and fundamental rights.

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Lithuania and Romania Complicit for Hosting CIA “Black Sites”

On 31 May 2018, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) confirmed in two simultaneously published judgments, Abu Zubaydah v. Lithuania and Al Nashiri v. Romania, that Lithuania and Romania were involved in the running of secret detention facilities of the CIA, so-called “black sites”, on their territories as well as their “complicity” in the execution of CIA’s secret extraordinary rendition programme for suspected terrorists.

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The Hungarian Constitutional Court betrays Academic Freedom and Freedom of Association

On 5 June the Hungarian Constitutional Court issued two injunction decisions, almost identical in their texts, which suspend the constitutional review procedures against two laws enacted in early April, 2017 by the Hungarian Parliament, outside the normal legislative process. The first, an amendment to the Act on National Higher Education known as „Lex CEU“ was challenged by a constitutional complaint, the second, the Act of the Transparency of Organizations Receiving Foreign Funds by 60 opposition MPs of the Hungarian Parliament with an abstract norm control notion. The handling of these two petitions by the Constitutional Court was odd in more than just one respect.

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Inkonsistentes aus Luxemburg: die Schlussanträge des EuGH im Chefarzt-Fall

Ein katholisches Krankenhaus, das seinem katholischen Chefarzt wegen dessen Scheidung und Wiederheirat kündigt, verstößt gegen das Verbot der Diskriminierung aus Gründen der Religion. Zu diesem Schluss kommt der Generalanwalt am EuGH Melchior Wathelet in seinen letzte Woche veröffentlichten Schlussanträgen zum so genannten Chefarzt-Fall. Folgt der EuGH den Schlussanträgen, könnte dies nicht nur das deutsche kirchliche Arbeitsrecht zu einer Neujustierung zwingen, sondern auch einen handfesten Konflikt mit dem Bundesverfassungsgericht heraufbeschwören.

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Who Controls a Facebook Page?

Days after the General Data Protection Regulation has entered into force, data protection and social networks are in the news again: Last Tuesday, the ECJ has decided that the administrator of a Facebook page is jointly responsible, along with Facebook itself, for processing personal data of Facebook users and persons visiting the page hosted on Facebook via web tracking.

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